Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" But let the frame of things disjoint, both the worlds suffer, Ere we will eat our meal in fear, and sleep In the affliction of these terrible dreams That shake us nightly. Better be with the dead, Whom we, to gain our peace, have sent to peace, Than on... "
A collection of printed papers relating to Durham school made by H. Holden ... - Page 14
by Durham city, sch - 1852
Full view - About this book

The dramatic works of William Shakspeare, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1813
...let The frame of things disjoint, both the worlds sufler, Ere we will eat our meal in fear, and sleep In the affliction of these terrible dreams, That shake...nightly : Better be with the dead, Whom we, to gain our place, have sent to peace, Than on the torture of the mind to lie In restless ecstacy. Duncan is in...
Full view - About this book

Shakspeare's himself again; or the language of the poet asserted

Andrew Becket - 1815
...the exact point of time, the moment, 8tc. Macb. Better be with the dead, Whom we, to gain our place, have sent to peace, Than on the torture of the mind to lie. Whom toe, to gain our place, have sent to peace.} The old copy reads : Whom we to gain our peace, have...
Full view - About this book

Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - English drama (Comedy) - 1872 - 196 pages
...of life is drawn, and the mere lees is left this vault to brag of" ; — " Better be with the dead than on the torture of the mind to lie in restless ecstasy " ; — " Come, seeling night, scarf up the tender eye of pitiful day." Also one of the Thanes, when...
Full view - About this book

Elegant extracts in poetry, Volume 2

Elegant extracts - 1816
...let the frame of things disjoint, both the worlds suffer, Ere we will eat our meal in fear, and sleep In the affliction of these terrible dreams, That shake us nightly. Better be with the dead Whom we, to gamour place, havesent to peace, Than on the tortute oi the mind to lie In restless ecstasy. — Duncan...
Full view - About this book

The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: With the Corrections ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1817
...let The frame of things disjoint, both the worlds aufler, Ere we will eat our meal in fear, and sleep In the affliction of these terrible dreams That shake...us nightly : Better be with the dead, Whom we, to gam our place, have sent to peace, 1 l.an on the torture of the mind to lie In restless ec«tacy.'...
Full view - About this book

Characters of Shakespear's Plays

William Hazlitt - 1817 - 352 pages
...of Banquo kings." 1 In the agitation of his thoughts, he envies those whom he has sent to peace. " Duncan is in his grave ; after life's fitful fever he sleeps well/'— It is true, he becomes more callous as he plunges deeper in guilt, " direness is thus rendered familiar...
Full view - About this book

Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 1

1817
...that forlorn and deserted situation in which he stands, compared with that of the murdered DUNCAN. " Duncan is in his grave, After life's fitful fever he sleeps well," &c. " My way of life Is fallen into the sear and yellow leaf," &c. Hence that scarce unwilling pity...
Full view - About this book

Characters of Shakespeare's Plays

William Hazlitt - 1818 - 323 pages
...seed of Bauquo kings." In the agitation of his thoughts, he envies those whom he has sent to peace. " Duncan is in his grave; after life's fitful fever he sleeps well." — It is true, he becomes more callous as he plunges deelier in guilt, "direnessis thus rendered familiar...
Full view - About this book

The Plays of Shakspeare, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1819
...let The frame of things disjoint, both the worlds suffer, Ere we will eat our meal in fear, and sleep In the affliction of these terrible dreams, That shake...us nightly : Better be with the dead, Whom we, to gam our place, have sent to peace, Than on the torture of the mind to lie In restless ecstacy. Duncan...
Full view - About this book

The Plays and Poems of William Shakspeare, Volume 11

William Shakespeare - 1821
...the frame of things disjoint, Both the worlds suffer 9, Ere we will eat our meal in fear, and sleep In the affliction of these terrible dreams, That shake...nightly: Better be with the dead, Whom we, to gain our place, have sent to peace ', Sorry, however, might signify sorrowful, melancholy, dismal. So, in The...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF