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" MAN is said to be a sociable animal, and, as an instance of it, we may observe, that we take all occasions and pretences of forming ourselves into those little nocturnal assemblies, which are commonly known by the name of clubs. When a set of men find... "
The Spectator: A Digest-index - Page 39
by William Wheeler - 1892 - 178 pages
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The Works Of... Joseph Addison

Joseph Addison - 1854
...Tiger with tiger, bear with bear, you'll find In leagues offensive and defensive join'd. TATE. • MAN is said to be a sociable animal, and, as an instance...which are commonly known by the name of clubs. When a set of men find themselves agree in any particular, though never so trivial, they establish themselves...
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The Works of Joseph Addison: Including the Whole Contents of Bp ..., Volume 4

Joseph Addison - English literature - 1854
...Xv.16& Tiger with tiger, bear with bear, you'li find In leagues offensive and defensive join'd. TATE. MAN is said to be a sociable animal, and, as an instance...which are commonly known by the name of clubs. When a set of men find themselves agree in any particular, though never so trivial, they establish themselves...
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The Spectator

Joseph Addison - 1856
...168. Tiger with tiger, bear with bear, you'll find In leagues offensive and defensive join'cl. TA.TX. MAN is said to be a sociable animal, and, as an instance...which are commonly known by the name of clubs. When a set of men find themselves agree in any particular, though never so trivial, they establish themselves...
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The works of ... Joseph Addison, with notes by R. Hurd, Volume 2

Joseph Addison - 1856
...SATURDAY, MAECH 10. Tigris agit rabidii cum ligride pacem Perpetuam, saevis inter se convenit ursis. Juv. MAN is said to be a sociable animal, and, as an instance...which are commonly known by the name of clubs. When a set of men find themselves agree in any particular, though never so trivial, they establish themselves...
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The Spectator

Joseph Addison - 1856
...168. Tiger with tiger, bear with bear, you'll find In leagues offensive iwd defensive joinM. TATE. is said to be a sociable animal, and, as an instance...which are commonly known by the name of clubs. When a set of men find themselves agree in any particular, though never so trivial, they establish themselves...
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The Spectator [by J. Addison and others].

Spectator The - 1857
...offensive and defensive join'd. — T ATI. MAN is said to be a sociable animal, and, as an in stance of it, we may observe that we take all occasions and...which are commonly known by the name of clubs. When a set of men find themselves agree in any particular, though never so trivial, they establish themselves...
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The British Essayists: With Prefaces, Historical and Biographical, Volume 5

Alexander Chalmers - English essays - 1855
...163. Tiger with tiger, bear with bear you '11 find In leagues offensive and defensive join'd. TATE. occasions and pretences of forming ourselves into...which are commonly known by the name of clubs. When a set of men find themselves agree in any particular, though never so trivial, they establish themselves...
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The American Stranger's Guide to London and Liverpool at Table: How to Dine ...

Americans - 1859 - 68 pages
...the origin of the reunions of more than one hundred and fifty years ago. "Man is said to be a social animal; and as an instance of it we may observe, that...which are commonly known by the name of clubs. When a set of men find themselves agree in any particular, though never so trivial, they establish themselves...
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Addison's humorous essays, selected from the 'Spectator'.

1863
...them both, and that he will not fail to comfort and support me under them. CLUBS. MAN is said to bo a sociable animal, and as an instance of it, we may observe that we take all occasious and pretences of forming ourselves into those little nocturnal assemblies which are commonly...
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Notes and Queries

Electronic journals - 1866
...paper on the origin of Clubs (Spectator, No. 9), has wisely remarked, that " Man is said to be a social animal, and, as an instance of it, we may observe,...which are commonly known by the name of Clubs. When a set of men find themselves agree in any particular, though never so trivial, they establish themselves...
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