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" MAN is said to be a sociable animal, and, as an instance of it, we may observe, that we take all occasions and pretences of forming ourselves into those little nocturnal assemblies, which are commonly known by the name of clubs. When a set of men find... "
The Spectator: A Digest-index - Page 39
by William Wheeler - 1892 - 178 pages
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The Spectator, Volume 1

George Gregory Smith - 1897
...March 10, - Tigris agii rablda cum tig ride pacem Perpetuamt saevis inier se convenit ursis. — Juv, MAN is said to be a Sociable Animal, and, as an Instance...that we take all Occasions and Pretences of forming our selves into those little Nocturnal Assemblies, which are commonly known by the name of Clubs* When...
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The History of Freemasonry, Volume 3

Albert Gallatin Mackey - 1898
...grand."8 Addison, speaking in the Spectator of these associations, says : " Man is said to be a social animal, and as an instance of it we may observe that we take all occasions and pretenses of forming ourselves into those little nocturnal assemblies which are commonly known as clubs....
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The History of Freemasonry, Volume 3

Albert Gallatin Mackey - 1898
...grand." 8 Addison, speaking in the Spectator of these associations, says : " Man is said to be a social animal, and as an instance of it we may observe that we take all occasions and pretenses of forming ourselves into those little nocturnal assemblies which are commonly known as clubs....
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English Composition: A Manual of Theory and Practice

Leslie Cope Cornford - English language - 1900 - 225 pages
...The Spectator. Tigris agit rabidd cum tigride pacem Perpetuam, favis inter se convenit unis. — Jcv. MAN is said to be a Sociable Animal, and, as an Instance...that we take all Occasions and Pretences of forming our selves into those little Nocturnal Assemblies, which are commonly known by the Name of Clubs. When...
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English Humorists of the Eighteenth Century: Sir Richard Steele, Joseph ...

English literature - 1906 - 514 pages
...Sat. iv. 163. Tiger with tiger, bear with bear, you'll find In leagues offensive and defensive join'd. MAN is said to be a sociable animal, and, as an instance...it, we may observe that we take all occasions and pretensions of forming ourselves into those little nocturnal assemblies, which are commonly known by...
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Sir Roger de Coverley and the Spectator's Club

Sir Richard Steele, Joseph Addison - 1908 - 192 pages
...xv. 163. Tiger with tiger, bear with bear you'll find la leagues offensive and defensive joined. TATE MAN is said to be a sociable animal, and as an instance...nocturnal assemblies which are commonly known by the namo of clubs. When a set of men find themselves agree in any particular, though never so trivial,...
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An Encyclopedia of Freemasonry and Its Kindred Sciences ..., Volume 1

Albert Gallatin Mackey - 1912
...Addison, in his paper on the origin of clubs (Spectator, No. 9), remarks: "Man is said to be a social animal, and as an instance of it we may observe that...which are commonly known by the name of clubs. When a set of men find themselves agree in any particular, though never so trivial, they establish themselves...
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Practical English Composition, Book 3

Edwin Lillie Miller - English language - 1920
...attempting this task, however, make a careful study of the rest of this chapter. V. Model CLUBS I. Man is said to be a sociable animal; and, as an instance of this, we may observe that we take all occasions and pretences of forming ourselves into those little...
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Politeness and Its Discontents: Problems in French Classical Culture

Peter France - Literary Criticism - 1992 - 245 pages
...instance begins: 'Man is said to be a sociable animal', and launches into a satirical description of 'those little nocturnal assemblies which are commonly known by the name of clubs' (I, 39) (comic examples being the club of fat men or the Humdrum Club of boring silent men). In the...
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Conversation: A History of a Declining Art

Stephen Miller - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2006 - 336 pages
...popularity of clubs, like the popularity of coffeehouses, was a sign for Addison of humankind's sociability. "Man is said to be a Sociable Animal, and, as an Instance...that we take all Occasions and Pretences of forming our selves into those little Nocturnal Assemblies, which are commonly known by the Name of Clubs."...
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