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" How charming is divine Philosophy! Not harsh and crabbed, as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's lute, And a perpetual feast of nectared sweets, Where no crude surfeit reigns. "
Comus: A Mask - Page 39
by John Milton - 1858 - 90 pages
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The Poetical Works of Milton, Young, Gray, Beattie, and Collins

English poetry - 1836
...carnal sensuality To a degenerate and degraded state. See. Br. How charming is divine Philosophy ! Not harsh, and crabbed, as dull fools suppose, But musical...of nectared sweets, Where no crude surfeit reigns. El. Br. List, list ; I hear Some far-off halloo break the silent air. Sec. B. Methought so too; what...
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Cook's Oracle: Containing Receipts for Plain Cookery, on the Most Economical ...

William Kitchiner - Cooking, English - 1836 - 422 pages
...noxious; — and that every thing that is Nasty is wholesome. " How charming is Divine Philosophy ! Not harsh, and crabbed, as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's lute, And a perpetual feast of nectar'd swcets, Where no crude surfeit reigns." — MILTON. Worthy William Shakspeare declared he...
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Another stroll, being the third, of W.C.S. and his alter idem friend P.P.

sir William Cusack Smith (2nd bart.) - 1836
...Religion winning to gaiety and youth. What has Milton said ? How charming is divine philosophy I Not harsh, and crabbed, as dull fools suppose; But musical as is Apollo's lute, And a perpetual feast of nectar'd sweets, Where no crude surfeit reigns.* Less than he has said of Philosophy, I would not,...
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Literary Remains of the Late William Hazlitt, Volume 1

William Hazlitt - 1836
...mind first became directed to the prosecution of philosophical inquiry, — to him, at least — " Not harsh and crabbed as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's lute." After having diligently studied the works of some of the most eminent metaphysicians, the youthful...
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Modernist Montage: The Obscurity of Vision in Cinema and Literature

P. Adams Sitney - Performing Arts - 1990 - 250 pages
...uniform. The tone with which he incants the lines from Comus: How charming is divine Philosophy! Not harsh, and crabbed as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's lute . . . (11. 476-78) argues against the message he asserts; in this context it forbodes a "crabbed" and...
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The Works of John Milton: With an Introduction and Bibliography

John Milton - Poetry - 1994 - 486 pages
...sensualty To a degenerate and degraded state. SECOND BROTHER How charming is divine Philosophy! Not harsh and crabbed, as dull fools suppose, But musical...Apollo's lute, And a perpetual feast of nectared sweets, ELDER BROTHER List! list! I hear 480 Some far-off hallo break the silent air. SECOND BROTHER Methought...
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New Directions in Economic Methodology

Roger Backhouse - Business & Economics - 1994 - 394 pages
...gentleman's [FCS Schiller's] particular bete noire, it will be as Shakespeare said (of it remember) 'Not harsh and crabbed, as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's lute,' etc. (5.S37)22 A division of labour presupposes a common enterprise. For Peirce there is a difference...
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Milton: The life

William Riley Parker, Gordon Campbell - Religion - 1996 - 1539 pages
...brother to exclaim (one must imagine the audience listening): How charming is divine philosophy I Not harsh and crabbed, as dull fools suppose, But musical...of nectared sweets Where no crude surfeit reigns. (476-80) At this point they hear someone approaching, and Milton gives the boys speeches probably more...
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Poetry and the Practical

William Gilmore Simms - Literary Criticism - 1998 - 124 pages
...diligence; but where did you ever see them feed their souls? At what fountains of sweet philosophy— "Not harsh and crabbed as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's lute," — have you beheld them drink of that Marah — that divine bitter, which refreshes the germ of immortality...
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Famous Lines: A Columbia Dictionary of Familiar Quotations

Robert Andrews - Reference - 1997 - 625 pages
...his tomb in Highgate Cemetery, London. 10 How charming is divine philosophy! Not harsh and crabb'd, as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's...of nectared sweets, Where no crude surfeit reigns. JOHN MlLTON, (1608-1674) British poet. Second brother, in "Comus," I. 476-80 (1637). 1 1 Bishop Berkeley...
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