Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books 81 - 90 of 100 on To this war of every man against every man this also is consequent, that nothing....
" To this war of every man against every man this also is consequent, that nothing can be unjust. The notions of right and wrong, justice and injustice, have there no place. "
The Quarterly Review - Page 435
edited by - 1887
Full view - About this book

First Philosophy I: Values and Society: Fundamental Problems and Readings in ...

Andrew Bailey - Philosophy - 2004 - 340 pages
...men. To this war of every man against every man, this also is consequent; that nothing can be unjust. The notions of right and wrong, justice and injustice, have there no place. Where there is no common power, there is no law; where no law, no injustice. Force and fraud are in...
Limited preview - About this book

Global Politics as If People Mattered

Mary Ann Tétreault, Ronnie D. Lipschutz - Business & Economics - 2005 - 225 pages
...says, "To this war of every man against every man, this also is consequent; that nothing can be unjust. The notions of right and wrong, justice and injustice, have there no place. Where there is no common power, there is no law; where no law, no injustice."30 There are two key elements...
Limited preview - About this book

Hobbes

Aloysius Martinich - Biography & Autobiography - 2005 - 261 pages
...Hobbes 's views, for he also wrote that in the state of nature "nothing can be unjust." He continues: "[T]he notions of right and wrong, justice and injustice, have there no place. Where there is no common power, there is no law; where no law, no injustice" (L 13.13). He repeats...
Limited preview - About this book

Penology, Justice and Liberty: Are You a Man Or a Mouse?

James C. McEleney, Barbara Lavin McEleney - Social Science - 2005 - 148 pages
...amoral. To this war of every man, against every man. this also is consequent: that nothing can be unjust. The notions of right and wrong, justice and injustice have there no place. Where there is no common power, there is no law: where no law, no injustice. (Hobbes, (1651) 1960:83)...
Limited preview - About this book

Current Continental Theory and Modern Philosophy

Stephen Hartley Daniel - Philosophy - 2005 - 290 pages
...to demarcate himself from Hobbes, in whose state of nature as described in chapter 13 of Leviathan "the notions of Right and Wrong, Justice and Injustice have there no place" and where there can be "no propriety, no Dominion, no mine and thine distinct; but only that to be...
Limited preview - About this book

Die Philosophie Shaftesburys im Gefüge der mundanen Vernunft der frühen Neuzeit

Ludwig von Bar - Reason - 2007 - 166 pages
...„To this war of every man, against every man, this also is consequent; that nothing can be unjust. The notions of right and wrong, justice and injustice have there no place. Where there is no common power, there is no law, no injustice. Force, and fraud, are in war the two...
Limited preview - About this book

Collective Decisions and Voting: The Potential for Public Choice

Nicolaus Tideman - Political Science - 2006 - 335 pages
...man." To this wane of every man against every man, this also is consequent; that nothing can be Unjust. The notions of Right and Wrong, Justice and Injustice have there no place. Where there is no common Power, there is no Law: where no Law, no Injustice. Force, and Fraud, are...
Limited preview - About this book

Putting Ideas to Work: A Practical Introduction to Political Thought

Mark Mattern - Philosophy - 2006 - 459 pages
...naturally "solitary, poore, nasty, brutish, and short." Under these conditions, "nothing can be Unjust. The notions of Right and Wrong, Justice and Injustice have there no place," for "where there is no common Power, there is no Law . . . [and] where no Law, no Injustice." With...
Limited preview - About this book

An Introduction to Political Philosophy

Colin Bird - Philosophy - 2006
...passage: To this war of every man against every man, this also is consequent; that nothing can be Unjust. The notions of Right and Wrong, Justice and Injustice, have there no place. Where there is no common Power, there is no Law; where no Law, no Injustice. Force and Fraud are in...
Limited preview - About this book

Law and Empire in English Renaissance Literature

Brian C. Lockey - Literary Criticism - 2006
...of natural law which would regulate such international conflict simply did not and could not exist: "The notions of Right and Wrong, Justice and Injustice have there no place. Where there is no common Power, there is no Law: where no Law, no Injustice. Force, and Fraud, are...
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF