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" O shame! where is thy blush? Rebellious hell, If thou canst mutine in a matron's bones, To flaming youth let virtue be as wax, And melt in her own fire: proclaim no shame When the compulsive ardour gives the charge, Since frost itself as actively doth... "
The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text of the ... - Page 215
by William Shakespeare - 1803
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The Kendall/Hunt Anthology: Literature to Write About

K. H. Anthol - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2003 - 313 pages
...sickly part of one true sense 80 Could not so mope.] O shame! where is thy blush? Rebellious hell. If thou canst mutine in a matron's bones. To flaming...as wax And melt in her own fire. Proclaim no shame 85 When the compulsive ardour gives the charge, Since frost itself as actively doth burn, [And] reason...
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Shakespeare's Webs: Networks of Meaning in Renaissance Drama

Arthur F. Kinney - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 168 pages
...Claudius, and we know the profound effect such a suggestion has, at least momentarily, on Queen Gertrude: O Hamlet, speak no more! Thou turn'st mine eyes into...such black and grained spots As will not leave their tinct. (3.4.78-81) She refers here to the concept of the mirror as man's soul, synderesis, that part...
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The Construction of Tragedy: Hubris

Mary Anneeta Mann - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 228 pages
...of you. When Hamlet has finished describing what is reflected in the mirror for her, Gertrude says: O Hamlet, speak no more. Thou turns't mine eyes into...such black and grained spots As will not leave their tinct. Hamlet and the ghost of his father both try to separate Gertrude from Claudius. The ghost appears...
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The Great Comedies and Tragedies

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2005 - 896 pages
...sickly part of one true sense 80 Could not so mope: O shame, where is thy blush? Rebellious hell, If thou canst mutine in a matron's bones, To flaming...Since frost itself as actively doth burn, And reason pandars will. QUEEN O Hamlet, speak no more. Thou turn'st my eyes into my very soul, And there I see...
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The Living Image: Shakespearean Essays

T. R. Henn - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 168 pages
...ofenseamed; Hamlet's term of disgust for his Mother. The images converge, as it were, from two sides : Queen. O Hamlet ! speak no more ; Thou turn'st mine...such black and grained spots As will not leave their tinct. Hamlet. Nay, but to live In the rank sweat of an enseamtd bed Stew'd in corruption, honeying...
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영미 명작 좋은 번역을 찾아서

영미문학연구회 - American literature - 2005 - 584 pages
...a sickly part of one true sense Could not so mope. O shame, where is thy blush? Rebellious hell, If thou canst mutine in a matron's bones, To flaming...fire; proclaim no shame When the compulsive ardour give the charge, Since frost itself as actively doth burn And reason panders will. (65~88*S) 햄릿...
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Shakespeare's Christianity: The Protestant and Catholic Poetics of Julius ...

E. Beatrice Batson - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 178 pages
...manifest. As a result of his accusations, as with a personified voice of conscience, she exclaims, "O Hamlet, speak no more! / Thou turn'st mine eyes...black and grained spots / As will not leave their tinct" (3.4.88-91). And so, unlike Claudius, Gertrude does repent, and she also goes on to keep her...
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Shakespeare's Window Into the Soul: The Mystical Wisdom in Shakespeare's ...

Martin Lings - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 224 pages
...for overwhelming her with what she inescapably knows to be true, and she is eventually driven to say: O Hamlet, speak no more; Thou turn'st mine eyes into...such black and grained spots As will not leave their tinct.8(III, 4, 88-91) It is often the case in Shakespeare's greater plays that there should be more...
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Chekhov Plays

Anton Chekhov - Fiction - 2007 - 352 pages
...Degustibus aut bcne, aut nihil. TREPLYOV enters from behind the stage. ARKADINA [recitingfrom Hamlet]. Oh, Hamlet, speak no more! Thou turn'st mine eyes into...such black and grained spots As will not leave their tinct. TREPLYOV [from Hamlet]. And let me wring thy heart, for so I shall, If it be made of penetrable...
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