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" But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks! It is the east, and Juliet is the sun ! — Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, Who is already sick and pale with grief, That thou her maid art far more fair than she... "
The Works of Shakespeare: The Text Regulated by the Recently Discovered ... - Page 305
by William Shakespeare, John Payne Collier - 1853
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Dramas: The separation: a tragedy. The stripling: a tragedy ... written in ...

Joanna Baillie - 1836
...again, can any thing be more beautiful than when, looking up to Juliet's window, he exclaims, — " Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, Who is...That thou, her maid, art far more fair than she." O how fine ! — You are silent : don't you think so? CLERMONT. There are many passages in the play...
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Principles of elocution

William Graham (teacher of elocution.) - 1837
...through yonder window breaks ? It is the east, and Juliet is the sun ! ar! abmx, ct a Ktndoa. Arise, fan- sun, and kill the envious moon, Who is already sick...maid, since she is envious ; Her vestal livery is but sick and green, And none but fools do wear it ; cast it oft". It is my lady j 0, it is my love ; O,...
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The Original, Volume 1

Thomas Walker - 1835
...idea, and with the waning moon above him, he goes on in the true Italian style of poetry and love, Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, Who is...maid since she is envious ; Her vestal livery is but sick and green, And none but fools do wear it ; — cast it off. At the conclusion of this passage,...
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The New Monthly Belle Assemblée, Volume 24

Fashion
...cheek upon her hind ! O that I were a glove upon that hand That I might touch that cheek"— ***** " But soft ! what light through yonder window breaks...already sick and pale with grief, That thou, her maid, is far more fair thin sht. ****** It is my lad; ! O it is my lore ! O that she knew she were !" &c.,...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: King Lear. Romeo and Juliet ...

William Shakespeare - 1839
...ribaldry. SCENE II. Capulet's Garden. Enter ROMEO. Rom. He jests at scars, that never felt a wound.1 [ JULIET appears above, at a window. But, soft ! what...thou her maid art far more fair than she. Be not her maid,2 since she is envious ; Her vestal livery is but sick and green, And none but fools do wear it...
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Romeo and Juliet

William Shakespeare - 1839
...— Lamps half down. Enter ROMEO R. ROMEO AND JULIET. But soft ! What light through yonder wintlow breaks? It is the east, and Juliet is the sun ! Arise,...pale with grief, That thou, her maid, art far more fuir than she. — She speaks, yet she says nothing ; what of that ? Her eye discourses : I will answer...
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King Lear. Romeo and Juliet

William Shakespeare - 1841
...To seek him here, that means not to be found. [Exeunt SCENE II. Capulet's garden. Enter ROMEO. Ro. He jests at scars, that never felt a wound. — [Juliet...maid, since she is envious ; Her vestal livery is but sick and green, And none but fools do wear it : cast it off. It is my lady ; O, it is my love ! O,...
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The Works of William Shakespeare: Troilus and Cressida. Coriolanus. Titus ...

William Shakespeare, John Payne Collier - 1842
...truckle-bed ; This field-bed is too cold for me to sleep. Come, shall we go ? Ben. Go, then ; for 'tis in vain To seek him here, that means not to be found*....maid, since she is envious ; Her vestal livery is but sick and green, And none but fools do wear it ; cast it off. — It is my lady ; O ! it is my love...
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The works of William Shakespeare, the text formed from an entirely ..., Volume 6

William Shakespeare - 1842
...Come, shall we go ? Ben. Go, then ; for 'tis in vain To seek him here, that means not to be found4. [Exeunt. SCENE II. CAPULET'S Garden. Enter ROMEO....maid, since she is envious ; Her vestal livery is but sick and green, And none but fools do wear it ; cast it off. — It is my lady ; O ! it is my love...
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The Works of William Shakespeare: Troilus and Cressida ; Coriolanus ; Titus ...

William Shakespeare, John Payne Collier - 1842
...shall we go ? Ben. Go, then ; for 'tis in vain To seek him here, that means not to be found*. \JExeunt. SCENE II. CAPULET'S Garden. Enter ROMEO. Rom. He jests...maid, since she is envious ; Her vestal livery is but sick and green, And none but fools do wear it ; cast it off. — It is my lady ; O ! it is my love...
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