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" I was confirmed in this opinion, that he, who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem... "
The Prose Works of John Milton: With a Life of the Author - Page 159
by John Milton - 1806
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The Columbia History of British Poetry

Carl R. Woodring, James Shapiro - Literary Criticism - 2007 - 732 pages
...activity as the final preparation for a heroic poem. As he puts it in the Apology, "he who would . . . write well hereafter in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem," presumably, in his case, by involvement in a just cause. In the Reason of Church Government Milton...
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Rhetorical Traditions and British Romantic Literature

Don H. Bialostosky, Lawrence D. Needham - Literary Criticism - 1995 - 312 pages
...from Milton's observation in the Apology for Smectymnuus that "he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought...that is, a composition and pattern of the best and honorablest things" (Milton 694), a remark that itself fashions the exemplary individual in rhetorical...
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Emerson's Literary Criticism

Ralph Waldo Emerson - Literary Collections - 1995 - 252 pages
...all the offices, both private and public, of peace and war." He declared that "he who would aspire to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought...that is, a composition and pattern of the best and honorablest things, not presuming to sing high praises of heroic men or famous cities, unless he have...
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John Milton: 1732-1801

John T. Shawcross - Reference - 1995 - 452 pages
...observes in his Apology for Smectymnuus, that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem, that is, a composition of the best and honorablest things, — and have in himself the experience and practice of all that...
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Milton: The life

William Riley Parker - Poets, English - 1996 - 1539 pages
...elsewhere in the Apology he gave his earnest conviction 'that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things ought...best and honourablest things, not presuming to sing high praises of heroic men or famous cities unless he have in himself the experience and the practice...
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Dictionary of Quotations

Connie Robertson - Reference - 1998 - 669 pages
...consequences. MILTON John 1608-1674 7454 An Apology for Smectymnuus He who would not be frustrate of his life is not knowledge, but actlon. 4928 If some great power would agree to make 7455 An Apology for Smectymnuus His words ... like so many nimble and airy servitors trip about him...
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Margaret Fuller, Critic: Writings from the New-York Tribune, 1844-1846

Margaret Fuller - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2000 - 491 pages
...touch of his speat exposed deceit. Sweetymmius.' [ Smectymmius.' "He who would nor be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought...himself to be a true poem; that is, a composition and partern of the best and honorablest things; not presuming to sing high praises of heroic men, or famous...
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Fault Lines and Controversies in the Study of Seventeenth-century English ...

Claude J. Summers, Ted-Larry Pebworth - History - 2002 - 236 pages
...indicates its centrality to his political efforts and convictions: "He who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought...that is, a composition and pattern of the best and honorablest things — not pretending to sing high praises of heroic men or famous cities, unless he...
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The Major Works

John Milton - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 966 pages
...long it was not after, when f was confirmed in this opinion, that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem,0 that is, a composition and pattern of the best and honourablest things, not presuming to sing...
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Milton's Legacy

Kristin A. Pruitt, Charles W. Durham - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 257 pages
...would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought him selfe to bee a true Poem, that is, a composition, and pattern of...best and honourablest things; not presuming to sing high praises of heroick men, or famous Cities, unless he have in himself the experience and the practice...
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