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" ... fellow, upon changing his condition, will be no longer puzzled how to stand the raillery of his facetious companions; that he need not own he married only to plunder an heiress of her fortune, nor pretend that he uses her ill, to avoid the ridiculous... "
The Spectator - Page 197
1718
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The British Essayists: Spectator

James Ferguson - English essays - 1823
...a bashful fellow, upon changing his condition, will be no longer puzzled how to stand the raillery of his facetious companions ; that he need not own he married only to plunder an heiress of her fortune, nor pretend that he uses her ill, to avoid the ridiculous name of a fond husband....
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The Spectator: With Sketches of the Lives of the Authors, an ..., Volume 10

Spectator (London, England : 1711) - 1824
...a bashful fellow, upon changing his condition, will be no longer puzzled how to stand the raillery of his facetious companions; that he need not own he married only to plunder an heiress of her fortune, nor pretend that he uses her ill, to avoid the ridiculous name of a fond husband....
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The Spectator: Corrected from the Originals, Volume 7

1827
...a bashful fellow, upon changing his condition, will be no longer puzzled how to stand the raillery of his facetious companions ; that he need not own he married only to plunder an heiress of her fortune, nor pretend that he uses her ill, to avoid the ridiculous name of a fond husband....
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The Spectator: With Sketches of the Lives of the Authors, an ..., Volume 10

Spectator - 1832
...pretena that he uses her ill, to avoid the ridiculous name of a fond husband. Indeed, if I may speak my opinion of great part of the writings which once...prevailed among us, under the notion of humour, they are such as would tempt one to think there had been an association among the wits of those times to rally...
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The Works of Joseph Addison: The Spectator, no. 315-635

Joseph Addison - 1837
...uses her ill, to avoid the ridiculous name of a food • husband. Indeed, if I may speak my opinion ci great part of the writings which once prevailed among us under the notion of homour, they are such as would tempt one to think there had been an association among the wits of those...
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The Spectator [by J. Addison and others] with sketches of the ..., Volumes 9-10

Spectator The - 1853
...a bashful fellow, upon changing his condition, will be no longer puzzled how to stand the raillery of his facetious companions; that he need not own he married only to plunder an heiress of her fortune, nor pretend that he uses her ill, to avoid the ridiculous name of a fond husband....
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The Spectator: With a Biographical and Critical Preface, and Explanatory ...

1855
...a bashful fellow, upon changing his condition, will be no longer puzzled how to stand the raillery of his facetious companions; that he need not own he married only to plunder an heiress of her fortune, nor pretend that he uses her ill, to avoid the ridiculous name of a fond husband....
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The Works of Joseph Addison

1864
...upon changing his condition, will be no longer puzzled how to stand the raillery of his fa cetious companions; that he need not own he married only to plunder an heiress of her fortune, nor pretend that he uses her ill, to avoid the ridiculous name of a tond husband....
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The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers: From the Spector

Joseph Addison - 1901 - 208 pages
...a bashful fellow, upon changing his condition, will be no longer puzzled how to stand the raillery of his facetious companions, that he need not own he married only to plunder an heiress of her fortune, nor pretend that he uses her ill, to avoid the ridiculous name of a fond husband....
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The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers from the Spectator

Joseph Addison - 1903 - 208 pages
...a bashful fellow, upon changing his condition, will be no longer puzzled how to stand the raillery of his facetious companions, that he need not own he married only to plunder an heiress of her fortune, nor pretend that he uses her ill, to avoid the ridiculous name of a fond husband....
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