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" Shall I believe That unsubstantial death is amorous ; And that the lean abhorred monster keeps Thee here in dark to be his paramour? For fear of that, I will still stay with thee, And never from this palace of dim night Depart again: here, here will I... "
Cymbeline. Romeo and Juliet - Page 115
by William Shakespeare - 1788
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Symposia: Plato, the Erotic, and Moral Value

Louis A. Ruprecht - Philosophy - 1999 - 183 pages
...Death's pale flag is not advanced there. . . . Ah dear Juliet, Why art thou yet so fair? shall I believe That unsubstantial Death is amorous And that the lean...here in dark to be his paramour? For fear of that I still will stay with thee And never from this pallet of dim Night Depart again, here will I remain...
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The Gender of Death: A Cultural History in Art and Literature

Karl S. Guthke, Karl Siegfried Guthke - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 297 pages
...wedding bed, And death, not Romeo, take my maidenhead! (111, 2,136-137) And Romeo: Shall I believe That unsubstantial death is amorous, and that the...monster keeps Thee here in dark to be his paramour? (v, 3,102-105) There is more erotic sultriness when Shakespeare returns to the motif in Measure for...
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Understanding Romeo and Juliet: A Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and ...

Alan Hager - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 241 pages
...a very sexual dance of death with the person of Death. He asks, Shall I believe That insubstantial Death is amorous, And that the lean abhorred monster keeps Thee here in dark to be his paramour? (5.3-102) In his sublime yet diseased imagination, Romeo projects his own feelings on the grim reaper...
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Ten-minute Play Collection

Lindsay Price - Canadian drama - 2000 - 55 pages
...becomes Romeo and is no longer a geek. The piece is honest and not melodramatic. DANNY: Ah dear Juliet. Here, Here will I remain With worms that are thy chambermaids. O here Will I set up my everlasting rest And shake the yoke of inauspicious starts From this world wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last! Arms...
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The Tragedy of Anthony and Cleopatra

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2000 - 388 pages
...probing of the relation between death and desire, to a site of erotic consummation: Shall I believe That unsubstantial death is amorous, And that the...monster keeps Thee here in dark to be his paramour? Romeo 5.3.102-5 Now boast thee, Death, in thy possession lies A lass unparalleled. Anthony 5.2.313-14...
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Romeo and Juliet : a Play in One Act

Lindsay Price - 2001 - 39 pages
...by her side. ROMEO: Oh my love! My wife! Ah, dear Juliet, Why art thou yet so fair? Shall I believe That unsubstantial Death is amorous, And that the...here in dark to be his paramour? For fear of that, I still will stay with thee And never from this palace of dim night Depart again; here, here will I remain....
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Shakespearean Scholarship: A Guide for Actors and Students

Leslie O'Dell - Performing Arts - 2002 - 413 pages
...health, where ere thou tumblest in. O true Apothecary! "Thy drugs are quick. TTius with a kiss I die. Depart again; here, here will I remain, With Worms...Chambermaids: O here Will I set up my everlasting rest: And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars From this world-wearied flesh: Eyes look your last: Arms take...
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Shakespeare's Bawdy

Eric Partridge - Literary Criticism - 2001 - 291 pages
...'Lustful paramours', 1 Henry V1, in ii 53; cf. v iii 82.— R. & J., v iii 103-106, 'Shall 1 believe That unsubstantial Death is amorous; And that the...monster keeps Thee here in dark to be his paramour?' — MN Dream, iv ii, where it is Malapropized. 1n ME, it means 'wooer, or person wooed': one who acts...
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Romeo and Juliet

Jennifer Mulherin, Abigail Frost - Drama - 2001 - 32 pages
...on his bride. Romeo gazes on Juliet . . . Ah, dear Juliet, Why art thon yet so fair? Shall I believe That unsubstantial death is amorous, And that the...monster keeps Thee here in dark to be his paramour? Act v Sc iii Romeo then prepares himself to die. Romeo's last kiss . . . Eyes, look your last! Arms,...
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Romeo and Juliet

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2001 - 141 pages
...lean abhorred monster keeps ios Thee here in dark to be his paramour? For fear of that, I still will stay with thee, And never from this palace of dim...remain With worms that are thy chambermaids; O here no Will I set up my everlasting rest, And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars From this world-wearied...
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