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Books Books 41 - 50 of 152 on the people have nothing to do with the laws but to obey them..
" the people have nothing to do with the laws but to obey them. "
The Annual Register of World Events: A Review of the Year - Page 73
edited by - 1853
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The speeches of ... Richard Brinsley Sheridan, with a sketch of his life, ed ...

Richard Brinsley B. Sheridan - 1842
...not follow their example. We have heard strange doctrines maintained of late. We have heard " that the people have nothing to do with the laws, but to obey them;" and ^it has been said, " that the parliament belongs to the king, and not to the people." I hope we shall...
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Speeches of Lord Campbell: At the Bar, and in the House of Commons, with an ...

John Campbell Baron Campbell - Great Britain - 1842 - 520 pages
...collected, and on which they proceed. This is not a country in which it can be constitutionally said, that the people have nothing to do with the laws, but to obey them. The grounds on which laws are framed, must be understood, — must be approved of, — that the laws...
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Douglas Jerrold's shilling magazine

1845
...away their fortunes in paying tradesmen's bills ?" — of course not. There is one large class who have nothing to do with the laws but to obey them, and another, somewhat smaller, who have little to do with the laws but to make them. The vulgar debtor...
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Douglas Jerrold's Shilling Magazine, Volume 1

Douglas William Jerrold - 1845
...away their fortunes in pay ing tradesmen's bills ?" — of course not. There is one large class who have nothing to do with the laws but to obey them, and another, somewhat smaller, who have little to do with the laws but to make them. The vulgar debtor...
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The Lives of the Lords Chancellors and Keepers of the Great Seal of England ...

John Campbell Baron Campbell - Great Britain - 1851
...pressure of grievances, and may not complain of them, we are slaves indeed. To declare, therefore, that 'the people have nothing to do with the laws but to obey them,' was as fallacious as it was odious.* There was no ground for saying, that if people met to discuss...
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The Annual Register, Or, A View of the History and Politics of ..., Volume 94

History - 1853
...reference to Lord Derby's attack on democracy ; but his reference to it was not made so much to disclaim the epithet of " demagogue," as to present a contrast...the others are governed on the principle of fear. He described the attributes of the British Constitution, and showed that its principle is one of life...
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Annual Register, Volume 94

Edmund Burke - History - 1853
...democracy ; but his reference to it was not made so much to disclaim the epithet of " demagogue," аз to present a contrast between the principles of democracy...the others are governed on the principle of fear. He described the attributes of the British Constitution, and showed that its principle is one of life...
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SPEECHES

TUD RT. HON THOMAS BABINGTON MACAULAY - 1853
...existence of a free Government itself. If you choose to adopt the principle of Bishop Horsley, that the people have nothing to do with the laws but to obey them, then, indeed, you may deprecate agitation ; but, while we live in a free country, and under a free...
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Speeches, parliamentary and miscellaneous, Volume 1

Thomas Babington Macaulay (baron [speeches]) - 1853
...existence of a free Government itself. If you choose to adopt the principle of Bishop Horsley, that the people have nothing to do with the laws but to obey them, then, indeed, you may deprecate agitation ; but while we live in a free country, and under a free Government,...
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Memoirs of the life of the Rt. Hon. Richard Brinsley Sheridan, Volume 2

Thomas Moore - 1853
...accordingly, we find him in the present session declaring, in his place in the House of Lords, that " the people have nothing to do with the laws but to obey them." The government, too, had lately given countenance to writers, the absurd slavishness of whose doctrines...
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