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Books Books 61 - 70 of 156 on the people have nothing to do with the laws but to obey them..
" the people have nothing to do with the laws but to obey them. "
The Annual Register of World Events: A Review of the Year - Page 73
edited by - 1853
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Life and Correspondence of Richard Whately, D.D.: Late Archbishop ..., Volume 1

Richard Whately, Elizabeth Jane Whately - 1866 - 480 pages
...surely be as much admixture of republican elements in the one as in the other. In an absolute monarchy the people have nothing to do with the laws but to obey them, and if then the Church and State are combined, there is no self-government in either. But in Great Britain...
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Speeches of ... Thomas Babington Macaulay, corrected by himself

Thomas Babington Macaulay (baron [speeches]) - 1866
...reprobate agitation, merely as agitation, unless he is prepared to adopt the maxim of Bishop Horsley, that the people have nothing to do with the laws but to obey them. The truth is that agitation is inseparable from popular government. If you wish to get rid of agitation,...
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The works of lord Macaulay, complete, ed. by lady Trevelyan, Volume 8

Thomas Babington baron Macaulay - 1866
...reprobate agitation merely as agitation, unless he is prepared to adopt the maxim of Bishop Horsley, that the people have nothing to do with the laws but to obey them. The truth is that agitation is inseparable from popular government. If you wish to get rid of agitation,...
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All the Year Round, Volume 14

1866
...lips of the ruling few were supposed to be a sufficient answer to the grievances of the subject many. "The people have nothing to do with the laws but to obey them ;" " If they don't like their country, let them leave it ;" " Glorious constitution ;" " Envy and admiration...
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Three English Statesmen: A Course of Lectures on the Political History of ...

Goldwin Smith - Great Britain - 1867 - 271 pages
...the day, and a sort of ecclesiastical henchman of Pitt, is known as the author of the maxim " that the people have nothing to do with the laws but to obey them." This prelate preached a sermon, published in his works, in which, correcting the imperfect views of...
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Memoirs of the Life and Reign of King George the Third, Volume 3

John Heneage Jesse - Great Britain - 1867
...God's providential arrangements," and another bishop asserting in the House of Lords that " the poor have nothing to do with the laws but to obey them" — and, lastly, when we find the Lord Justice Clerk of Scotland declaring from the Bench that the landed interest...
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Three English Statesmen: A Course of Lectures on the Political History of ...

Goldwin Smith - Great Britain - 1868 - 271 pages
...the day, and a sort of ecclesiastical henchman of Pitt, is known as the author of the maxim ' that the people have nothing to do with the laws but to obey them/ This prelate preached a sermon, published in his works, in which, correcting the imperfect views of...
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The Works of Lord Macaulay Complete, Volume 8

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - Great Britain - 1871
...reprobate agitation merely as agitation, unless he is prepared to adopt the maxim of Bishop Horsley, that the people have nothing to do with the laws but to obey them. The truth is that agitation is inseparable from popular government. If you wish to get rid of agitation,...
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Mohammed and Mohammedanism: Lectures Delivered at the Royal Institution of ...

Reginald Bosworth Smith - Christianity and other religions - 1874 - 252 pages
...words which have been wrongly construed to mean that at all times passive obedience is a duty, and that the people have nothing to do with the laws but to obey them. Nor has the Christian Church — sections of which have for strange and various, but intelligible,...
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The Works of Lord Macaulay: Speeches. Lays of ancient Rome. Miscellaneous poems

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - Criminal law - 1875
...reprobate agitation merely as agitation, unless he is prepared to adopt the maxim of Bishop Horsley, that the people have nothing to do with the laws but to obey them. The truth is that agitation is inseparable from popular government. If you wish to get rid of agitation,...
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