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" All places that the eye of heaven visits Are to a wise man ports and happy havens. Teach thy necessity to reason thus ; There is no virtue like necessity. "
Laconics: Or, The Best Words of the Best Authors - Page 277
by John Timbs - 1829
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The Life of a Boy, Volume 2

Miss Stockdale (Mary R.) - 1821
...his own ground. I love Ashiiurst — ah! in whose eyes can its summer woods be more lovely ? But ' all places that the eye of Heaven visits are to a wise man ports, and happy havens.' It will be the protector of such an one, and he will make an Ashhurst wherever his haven is found."...
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The plays of William Shakspeare, pr. from the text of the ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1823
...reproach of partiality. This is a just picture of the struggle between principle and affection. Gaunt. All places that the eye of heaven visits, Are to a...not, the king did banish thee; But thou the king: Woe doth the heavier sit, Where it perceives it is but faintly borne. Go, say — I sent thee forth...
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The dramatic works of William Shakspeare, from the text of Johnson, Stevens ...

William Shakespeare - 1823
...in the end, Having my freedom, boast of nothing else, But that I was a journeyman to grief? Gaunt. or it ; and the young lion repents : marry, not in...prince a better companion ! . Fal. Heaven send th thec ; But thou the king : Woe doth the heavier sit, Where it perceives it is but faintly borne. Go,...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare, in Ten Volumes: King John ...

William Shakespeare - 1823
...nothing else, But that I was a journeyman to grief ?' Gaunt. All places that the eye of heaven visits,1 Are to a wise man ports and happy havens : Teach thy...virtue like necessity. Think not, the king did banish thec ; But thou the king : Woe doth the heavier sit, Where it perceives it is but faintly borne. Go,...
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The Plays, Volume 5

William Shakespeare - 1824
...in the end, Having my freedom, boast of nothing else, But that I was a journeyman to grief? Gaunt. All places that the eye of heaven visits, Are to a...not, the king did banish thee ; But thou the king : Woe doth the heavier sit, Where it perceives it is but faintly borne. Go, say — I sent thee forth...
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The dramatic works of Shakspeare, from the text of Johnson and Stevens [sic ...

William Shakespeare - 1824
...nothing else, Bnt that I was a journeyman to grief? Gaunt. All places that the eye of heaven visits. Arc to a wise man ports and happy havens : Teach thy necessity...virtue like necessity. Think not, the king did banish lliee : [sit, But thou the kin»: Woe doth the heavier Where it perceives it is but faintly borne....
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The Dramatic Works of Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - 1824 - 830 pages
...grief? Gaunt. All places, that the eye of heaven visits, Are to a wise man ports and happy heavens. condescend to help me now. — [ They hang their heads....redress? — My body shall Pay recompence, if you will ! Woe doth the heavier sit, Where it perceives, it is but faintly borne. Go, say — I sent thee forth...
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The Beauties of Shakespeare: Selected from Each Play : with a General Index ...

William Shakespeare, William Dodd - Fore-edge painting - 1824 - 385 pages
...CONSOLATION UNDER BANISHMENT. Teach thy necessity to reason thus; Are to a wise man ports and happy havens: There is no virtue like necessity. Think not, the king did banish thee; But thou the king: Woe doth the heavier sit, Where it perceives it is but faintly borne. Go, say—I sent thee forth to...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1824
...in the end. Having my freedom, boast of nothing else. But that 1 was a journeyman to grief? Gaunt. All places that the eye of heaven visits, Are to a wise man ports and happy havens : (5) Had a part or share. (6) Reproach of partiality. (7) Gri«r. Teach thy neeeaiity to lima thus...
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The Dramatic Works of Shakespeare, Part 1

William Shakespeare - 1824 - 830 pages
...in the end, Having my freedom, boast of nothing else, But that I was a journeyman to grief? Gaunt. All places, that the eye of heaven visits, Are to a wise man ports and happy heavens. Teach thy necessity to reason thus ! There is no virtue like necessity. Think not, the king...
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