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" All places that the eye of heaven visits Are to a wise man ports and happy havens. Teach thy necessity to reason thus ; There is no virtue like necessity. "
Laconics: Or, The Best Words of the Best Authors - Page 277
by John Timbs - 1829
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The Works of Shakspeare: From the Text of Johnson, Steevens, and Reed

William Shakespeare - Actors - 1825 - 896 pages
...in the end, Having my freedom, boost of nothing else, But that I was a journeyman to grief? Gaunt. vy, thick; ( Whioh, else, runs tickling up and down the veins, thoa the king: Woe doth the heavier sit, Where it perceives it is bnt faintly borne. Go, say — I...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: From the Text of ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1825
...in the end, Having my freedom, boast of nothing else, But that I was a journeyman to grief? Gaunt. All places that the eye of heaven visits, Are to a...virtue like necessity. Think not, the king did banish t lice ; But thou the king : Wo doth the heavier sit, Where it perceives it is but faiutly borne. Go,...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: With Glossarial Notes, a Sketch of ...

William Shakespeare - 1825 - 908 pages
...in the end. Having my freedom, boast of nothing else, But that I was a journeyman to grief Gaunt. All places that the eye of heaven visits, Are to a wise man portal and happy havens : Teach thy necessity to reason thus ; There is no virtue like necessity. Think...
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The plays of William Shakspeare, pr. from the text by G. Steevens ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1826
...reproach of partiality. This is a just picture of the struggle between principle and affection. Gaunt. All places that the eye of heaven visits, Are to a...not, the king did banish thee ; But thou the king : Woe doth the heavier sit, Where it perceives it is but faintly borne. Go, say — I sent thee forth...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: Richard II. Henry IV, pt. 1-2 ...

William Shakespeare - 1826
...of nothing else, But that I was a journeyman to grief? Gaunt. All places that the eye of heaven 21 visits, Are to a wise man ports and happy havens :...Think not the king did banish thee ; But thou the king 22 : Woe doth the heavier sit, Where it perceives it is but faintly borne. Go, say — I sent thee...
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King Richard II. King Henry IV, part 1. King Henry IV, part 2. Henry V

William Shakespeare - 1826
...This speech and that which fallows are not in the folio. Gaunt. All places that the eye of heaven 21 visits, Are to a wise man ports and happy havens :...Think not the king did banish thee ; But thou the king22: Woe doth the heavier sit, Where it perceives it is but faintly borne. Go, say — I sent thee...
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The Plays of William Shakspeare, Volumes 11-12

William Shakespeare - Theater - 1826 - 960 pages
...; There is no virtue like necessity. Think not, the king did banish thee ; But thou the king : Woe oi. With tliis shepherdess, my sister ; here in the skirts of the forest, like fring thec forth to purchase honour, And not — the king exil'd thee : or suppose, Devouring pestilence...
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The Beauties of Shakspeare Regularly Selected from Each Play. With a General ...

William Shakespeare - 1827 - 345 pages
...men we entitle — patience, Is pale cold cowardice in noble breasts. CONSOLATION UNDER BANISHMENT. All places that the eye of heaven visits, Are to a...to reason thus; There is no virtue like necessity. x Think not, the king did banish thee; But thou the king: Wo doth the heavier sit, Where it perceives...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - 1827 - 791 pages
...boast of nothing e But that I was a journeyman to gtiet ? All places that the eye of heat-en visits, match 41. North. What would your grace have done unta...Clifford and Northumberland, Come, make him stand up ; Hut thou the king ; Woe doth the heavier lit, Where it perceives it is but faintly borne. (jo, say—...
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De Vere: Or, The Man of Independence, Volume 3

Robert Plumer Ward - English fiction - 1827
...observed De Vere, " had perhaps made him believe (and I wonder it was not among these inscriptions) that ' All places, that the eye of Heaven visits, Are to a wise man, ports and happy havens. Think not the king did banish thee, But thou the king. Look what thy soul holds dear — imagine it...
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