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" All places that the eye of heaven visits Are to a wise man ports and happy havens. Teach thy necessity to reason thus ; There is no virtue like necessity. "
Laconics: Or, The Best Words of the Best Authors - Page 277
by John Timbs - 1829
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Shakespeare's Styles: Essays in Honour of Kenneth Muir

Kenneth Muir, Philip Edwards - Drama - 2004 - 256 pages
...foil wherein thou art to set The precious jewel of thy home return. (11.265-7) In more general terms: All places that the eye of heaven visits Are to a wise man ports and happy havens. (II. 275-6) Hereford however cannot accept the situation: O, who can hold a fire in his hand By thinking...
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The Leatherstocking Tales: The pioneers, or The sources of the Susquehanna ...

James Fenimore Cooper - Bumppo, Natty (Fictitious character) - 1985
...use to them. Another jerk was given to the sleigh, and Leather-stocking was hid from view. Chapter II "All places that the eye of Heaven visits, Are to a wise man ports and happy havens: — Think not the king did banish thee; But thou the king. — " Richard //, I.iii.275— 76, 279—80....
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Aesthetics and the Literature of Ideas: Essays in Honor of A. Owen Aldridge

François Jost, Melvin J. Friedman - Philosophy - 1990 - 290 pages
...inner virtus and the Cynic reversal of terms, as in the legend of Diogenes (also recalled by Lyly) — There is no virtue like necessity: Think not the King did banish thee. But thou the King — , (1.3.278-80) calling for Bolingbroke's own show of dialectical skills: O, who can hold a fire...
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Four Histories

William Shakespeare - Literary Criticism - 1994 - 865 pages
...the end, Having my freedom, boast of nothing else But that I was a journeyman to grief? JOHN OF GAUNT All places that the eye of heaven visits Are to a...like necessity. Think not the King did banish thee, 280 But thou the King. Woe doth the heavier sit Where it perceives it is but faintly borne. Go, say...
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Externality and Institutions

Andreas A. Papandreou - Business & Economics - 1998 - 304 pages
...wealth-maximization is incoherent and incomplete. 10 Transaction Costs, Efficiency, and Counterfactuals All places that the eye of heaven visits Are to a...to reason thus; There is no virtue like necessity Shakespeare, Richard II If one wants to pass through open doors easily, one must bear in mind that...
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Edward the Second

Christopher Marlowe - Drama - 1995 - 384 pages
...highly] Dodsley1; Highly Qi-4. 14. into] Q; to Q2-4. 2-4. A proverbial sentiment; McLaughlin compares R>: 'All places that the eye of heaven visits / Are to...reason thus: / There is no virtue like necessity' (I.iii.275278); see also Tilley M426. 3. lay] resided (the preterite subjunctive of lie). 7. See note...
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The Complete Works of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1996 - 1263 pages
...end, Having my freedom, boast of nothing else But that I was a journeyman to grief? JOHN OF GAUNT. mockery, set: woe doth the heavier sit, Where it perceives it is but faintly borne. Go say, I sent theĞ forth to...
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Making Trifles of Terrors: Redistributing Complicities in Shakespeare

Harry Berger, Peter Erickson - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 487 pages
...son to accept exile gracefully and resign himself, as the wise do, to becoming a citizen of the world ("All places that the eye of heaven visits/ Are to a wise man ports and happy havens" [1.3.27576], a sentiment soon to be contradicted), he prepares to dispense counsel to another target....
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Night at the Vulcan

Ngaio Marsh - Fiction - 1998 - 256 pages
...the auditorium. Dr. Rutherford, who appeared to be less upset than anyone else, merely remarked that "All places that the eye of heaven visits are to a wise man ports and happy havens," which, as Percival said acidly, got them nowhere. Finally, Poole asked if the central-heating couldn't...
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The Wordsworth Dictionary of Quotations

Connie Robertson - Reference - 1998 - 669 pages
...and my life is done. 10444RichardII Things sweet to taste prove in digestlon sour. 10445flic/iarrf// ty. 9688 * practised. 9689 Reflectlons of a Bachelor Girl When you s 10446Richord// This royal throne of kings, this sceptered isle, This earth of majesty, this seat of...
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