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Books Books 21 - 30 of 180 on If I do prove her haggard, Though that her jesses were my dear heart-strings, I'd....
" If I do prove her haggard, Though that her jesses were my dear heart-strings, I'd whistle her off, and let her down the wind, To prey at fortune. "
The graphic & historical illustrator, ed. by E.W. Brayley - Page 188
edited by - 1834
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Elegant Extracts: Or, Useful and Entertaining Pieces of Poetry, Selected for ...

Vicesimus Knox - English poetry - 1796 - 1008 pages
...human dealings: if I prove her haggard, Though that her jeffes were my dear heartftrings, I 'd whiftle her off, and let her down the wind To prey at fortune. Haply, for I am black ; And And have riot thofe foft parts of converfation That chambercrs have : or,...
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Elements of Elocution: In which the Principles of Reading and Speaking are ...

John Walker - Elocution - 1799 - 398 pages
...dealings : if I do prove her haggard Though that her jefles were my dear heart-firings, I'd whittle her off and let her down the wind To prey at fortune. Haply, for I am black And have not thofe foft parts of converfation, That chamberers have, or for I...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare ...

William Shakespeare - 1803
...straps of leather tied about the foot of a hawk, by which she is held on the fist. HANMER. Line 4O2. I'd whistle her off, and let her down the wind, To prey at fortune.] The falconers always let fly the hawk against the wind; if she flies with the wind behind her, she...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the ..., Volume 10

William Shakespeare - 1803
...hard his re-admission to his pay and office. 1 A species of hawk, also a term of reproach applied to a I'd whistle her off, and let her down the wind, To prey at fortune. Haply, for I am black ; And have not those soft parts of conversation That chamberers 4 have : —...
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Memoirs of Charles Macklin, Comedian: With the Dramatic Characters, Manners ...

William Cook - Actors - 1804 - 444 pages
...starting into anger, " If I do find her haggard, " Though that her jesses were my deaf heart-string*. " I'd whistle her off, and let her down the wind " To prey at fortune.'' Then a pause as if to ruminate : •-, • '•-" Haply, for I am black, * And have not those soft...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare, Volume 8

William Shakespeare - 1804
...fellow's of exceeding honesty, And knows all qualities, with a learned spirit, Of human dealings : If I do prove her haggard, Though that her jesses were my dear heart-strings, I'd whistle her off, and let her down the wind, To prey at fortune. Haply, for I am...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare : Accurately Printed from the ..., Volume 10

William Shakespeare - 1805
...ha1vk, a hawk unreclaimed, or irreclaimable. DD 1 Though that her jesses were my dear heart-strings,4 I'd whistle her off, and let her down the wind, To prey at fortune.5 Haply, for I am black; And have not those soft parts of conversation That chamberers6 have:...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 9

William Shakespeare - 1805
...\awk, a hawk unreclaimed, or irreclaimable, DD 2 Though that her jesses were my dear heart-strings,4 I'd whistle her off, and let her down the wind, To prey at fortune.5 Haply, for I am black; And have not those soft parts of conversation That chamberers6 have:...
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The Works of Edmund Spenser, Volume 5

Edmund Spenser - 1805
...: --- " If I prove her haggard, " Though that her jefles were my dear heart-firings, " I'd whiftle her off, and let her down the wind " To prey at fortune.'' caft, XXXVI. The gentle Lady, loofe at randon lefte, The greene-wood long did walke, and wander At...
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Moral tales for young people, Volume 2

Maria Edgeworth - Children's stories - 1806
...staircase. " Gone !" cried miss Hodges, " Then never will I see or speak to her more. — " Thus I whistle her off, and let her down the wind to prey at fortune." " Gracious heart ! what quarrels," said Nat, " and doings, the night before our wedding day !" We leave...
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