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" I'll leave you till night: you are welcome to Elsinore. Ros. Good my lord ! [Exeunt Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. Ham. Ay, so, God be wi' you : — Now I am alone. O, what a rogue and peasant slave am I ! Is it not monstrous, that this player here, But... "
The London Encyclopaedia: Or, Universal Dictionary of Science, Art ... - Page 59
edited by - 1829
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The Literary Wittgenstein

John Gibson, John Gibson, Dr, Wolfgang Huemer - Philosophy - 2004 - 356 pages
...artor's histrionic intensity and his own culpable passivity: O, what a rogue and peasant slave am I! Is it not monstrous that this player here, But in...a dream of passion, Could force his soul so to his whole conceit That from her working a1l his visage wanned, Tears in his eyes, distrartion in 's aspect,...
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Shakespeare and Marx

Gabriel Egan - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 176 pages
...pipe?' (3.2.357—8). Yet he is mightily impressed with the effect of a performance upon the performer: Is it not monstrous that this player here, But in...a dream of passion, Could force his soul so to his whole conceit That from her working all his visage wanned, Tears in his eyes, distraction in "s aspect,...
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Theatre and Entertainment

Kathy Elgin - Amusements - 2005 - 32 pages
...in this way. In the floor of the stage was a trap-door, through which devils or ghosts could appear. Is it not monstrous that this player here, But in...a dream of passion, Could force his soul so to his own conceit That from her working all his visage wann'd. HAMLET, ACT 2, SCENE 2 but: only concert:...
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Introduction to Dramatherapy: Person and Threshold

Salvo Pitruzzella - Psychology - 2004 - 196 pages
...merits particular attention, and will be further explored in the next section. ACTOR AND CHARACTER Is it not monstrous that this player here, But in...a dream of passion. Could force his soul so to his whole conceit That from her working all his visage wanned. Tears in his eyes, distraction in's aspect,...
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Elizabethan Popular Theatre: Plays in Performance

Michael Hattaway - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 234 pages
...player becomes the very figure of the emotion proper to his character, here 'the distracted lover': Is it not monstrous that this player here, But in...a dream of passion, Could force his soul so to his own conceit That from her working all his visage wanned; Tears in his eyes, distraction in's aspect,...
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Separate Theaters: Bethlem ("Bedlam") Hospital and the Shakespearean Stage

Kenneth S. Jackson - Drama - 2005 - 309 pages
...follows, Shakespeare calls attention not just to Hamlet's "inaction," but the wonder of "playing": Is it not monstrous that this player here, But in...a dream of passion, Could force his soul so to his own conceit That from her working all his visage waned. Tears in his eyes, distraction in his aspect,...
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Theater and Entertainment

Kathy Elgin - Juvenile Nonfiction - 2005 - 32 pages
...the actors' skill. Even uneducated people were accustomed to using their imaginations in this way. Is it not monstrous that this player here, But in...a dream of passion, Could force his soul so to his own conceit That from her working all his visage wann'd. HAMLET, ACT 2, SCENE 2 but: only concert:...
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The Great Comedies and Tragedies

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2005 - 896 pages
...their leave HAMLET Ay, so, God bye to you! Now I am alone. O, what a rogue and peasant slave am I! Is it not monstrous that this player here, But in...a dream of passion, Could force his soul so to his own conceit That from her working all his visage wanned, Tears in his eyes, distraction in his aspect,...
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Shakespeare's Early Tragedies

Nicholas Brooke - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 232 pages
...which finally brings all this to bear directly on the play is a commentary on the Pyrrhus speech : Is it not monstrous that this player here, But in a fiction, in a dream of passion . . . (544-5) In a fiction, cause and effect relate directly, and an actor with a cue for passion,...
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Shakespeare's Rhetoric of Comic Character: Dramatic Convention in Classical ...

Karen Newman - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 168 pages
...Now I am alone. O what a rogue and peasant slave am I! Is it not monstrous that this player here, 545 But in a fiction, in a dream of passion, Could force his soul so to his own conceit That from her working all his visage wann'd, Tears in his eyes, distraction in his aspect,...
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