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" KNOWING within myself the manner in which this Poem has been produced, it is not without a feeling of regret that I make it public. What manner I mean, will be quite clear to the reader, who must soon perceive great inexperience, immaturity, and every... "
Lives of the Illustrious: (the Biographical Magazine). - Page 265
1852
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Early Reviews of English Poets, Ed. with an Introduction by John Louis Haney ...

John Louis Haney - Criticism - 1904 - 227 pages
...preface hints that his poem was produced under peculiar circumstances. ' Knowing within myself (he says) the manner in which this Poem has been produced, it...feverish attempt, rather than a deed accomplished. '—Preface, p. vii. We humbly beg his pardon, but this does not appear to us to be quite so clear...
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Early Reviews of English Poets

John Louis Haney - Criticism - 1904 - 227 pages
...preface hints that his poem was produced under peculiar circumstances. ' Knowing within myself (he says) the manner in which this Poem has been produced, it...feverish attempt, rather than a deed accomplished.' — Preface, p. vii. We humbly beg his pardon, but this does not appear to us to be quite so clear...
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Early Reviews of English Poets, Ed. with an Introduction by John Louis Haney ...

John Louis Haney - English poetry - 1904 - 227 pages
...preface hints that his poem was produced under peculiar circumstances. ' Knowing within myself (he says) the manner in which this Poem has been produced, it...mean, will be quite clear to the reader, who must soot* perceive great inexperience, immaturity, and every error denoting a feverish attempt, rather...
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Early Reviews of English Poets, Ed. with an Introduction by John Louis Haney ...

John Louis Haney - Criticism - 1904 - 227 pages
...preface hints that his poem was produced under peculiar circumstances. ' Knowing within myself (he says) the manner in which this Poem has been produced, it...is not without a feeling of regret that I make it public.—What manner I mean, will be quite clear to the reader, who must soon perceive great inexperience,...
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Aglavaine and Selysette

Maurice Maeterlinck - 1904 - 104 pages
...all, in words unapproachable for their delicate accuracy, by Keats in his famous preface to Endymion: "great inexperience, immaturity, and every error denoting...feverish attempt rather than a deed accomplished." "The imagination of a boy is healthy" — one can hardly forbear going on with the immortal words —...
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The Masters of English Literature

Stephen Lucius Gwynn - English literature - 1904 - 423 pages
...their credit. Endymion displayed, as Keats himself said in his touching preface, " great experience, immaturity, and every error denoting a feverish attempt, rather than a deed accomplished " ; its imagination is clouded, as he saw and said, with the ferment of the stage that lies between...
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The Poetical Works of John Keats

John Keats - English poetry - 1906 - 349 pages
...THE MEMORY or THOMAS CHATTERTON. 1818. KNOWING within myself the manner in which this Poem has bepn produced, it is not without a feeling of regret that...feverish attempt, rather than a deed accomplished. The two first books, and indeed the two last, I feel sensible are not of such completion as to warrant...
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The Makers of English Poetry

William James Dawson - English poetry - 1906 - 404 pages
...no criticism could be more just than the criticism of his own preface to it. He says, the reader " must soon perceive great inexperience, immaturity,...feverish attempt rather than a deed accomplished. This may be speaking presumptuously, and may deserve a punishment; but no feeling man will be forward...
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Wordsworth (1770) to Swinburne (1837)

Sir William Robertson Nicoll, Thomas Seccombe - England - 1907
...however, to be fair to the reviewers. Keats in the published preface to Endymion, said that the reader "must soon perceive great inexperience, immaturity,...feverish attempt rather than a deed accomplished." The Quarterly took him at his word, yet not without observing "a certain degree of talent which deserves...
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Lives of Great English Writers from Chaucer to Browning

Walter Swain Hinchman, Francis Barton Gummere - Authors, English - 1908 - 569 pages
...Keats's first considerable production, Endymion, came out. In the preface the author apologizes for his " inexperience, immaturity, and every error denoting...feverish attempt, rather than a deed accomplished." Again, with remarkably clear insight, " The imagination of a boy is healthy, and the mature imagination...
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