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" Pressed closely palm to palm and to his mouth Uplifted, he, as through an instrument, Blew mimic hootings to the silent owls, That they might answer him. — And they would shout Across the watery vale, and shout again, Responsive to his call, — with... "
The Miscellaneous Poems of William Wordsworth - Page 117
by William Wordsworth - 1820
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The Poetics of Childhood

Roni Natov - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 289 pages
...on the "cliffs and islands" to remember — this boy who was so responsive to Nature, this boy who Blew mimic hootings to the silent owls, That they...watery vale, and shout again, Responsive to his call. (V, 11. 372-6) This boy becomes an icon of natural childhood, since he died before he was twelve, and...
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William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth - Juvenile Nonfiction - 2003 - 48 pages
...leaps up when I behold A rainbow in the sky Meet a boy who can talk (and listen) to Nature: Uplifted, he as through an instrument Blew mimic hootings to the silent owls That they might answer him. Encounter ordinary places, people, and events presented ii an extraordinary way. About the Editor A...
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Romanticism and Transcendence: Wordsworth, Coleridge, and the Religious ...

J. Robert Barth - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 146 pages
...between the boy and the natural world around him, and one may even see in the boy and the world of nature ("he, as through an instrument, / Blew mimic hootings to the silent owls" [5.374-75]), a figure of the poet himself in his intimate relationship with nature. But what is perhaps...
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Lyrical Ballads and Other Poems

William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Ballads, English - 2003 - 312 pages
...there, with fingers interwoven, both hands Press'd closely palm to palm and to his mouth Uplifted, he, as through an instrument, Blew mimic hootings to the silent owls 10 That they might answer him. And they would shout Across the wat'ry vale and shout again Responsive...
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L'inhumain

Carle Bonafous-Murat, André Topia - American literature - 2004 - 262 pages
...there, with fingers interwoven, both hands Pressed closely palm to palm, and to his mouth Uplifted, he, as through an instrument Blew mimic hootings to...redoubled, concourse wild Of mirth and jocund din. (V, 395-404) The « mimic hootings » (398) of the boy are an example of such human disturbance, a...
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Buried Communities: Wordsworth and the Bonds of Mourning

Kurt Fosso - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 292 pages
...nature and its supernatural mysteries. As the narrator relates, through those pressed hands the boy Blew mimic hootings to the silent owls That they might...halloos, and screams, and echoes loud Redoubled and redoubled—a concourse wild Of mirth and jocund din! (481-87) The connection between the boy and the...
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From Enlightenment to Romanticism: Anthology II

Ian L. Donnachie, Ian Donnachie, Carmen Lavin - History - 2004 - 400 pages
...hootings to the silent owls55 10 That they might answer him. And they would shout Across the wat'ry vale and shout again Responsive to his call, with...peals, And long halloos, and screams, and echoes loud " The 'unity' to which Wordsworth alludes here is an aesthetic unity, where the mind simply 'feels'...
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Romanticism and the Materiality of Nature

Onno Oerlemans - Literary Criticism - 2004 - 253 pages
...most profound of these is 'There Was a Boy,' which poignantly juxtaposes an account of the boy, who 'Blew mimic hootings to the silent owls, / That they might answer him' (PW, 2:206), and the description of the adult speaker standing mute over the boy's grave. Hartman's...
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The End of the Mind: The Edge of the Intelligible in Hardy, Stevens, Larkin ...

DeSales Harrison - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 276 pages
...there, with fingers interwoven, both hands Pressed closely palm to palm and to his mouth Uplifted, he, as through an instrument, Blew mimic hootings...echoes loud Redoubled and redoubled; concourse wild Of jocund din! And, when there came a pause Of silence such as baffled his best skill: Then, sometime,...
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The English Reader: What Every Literate Person Needs to Know

Diane Ravitch - Literary Collections - 2006 - 486 pages
...there, with fingers interwoven, both hands Pressed closely palm to palm, and to his mouth Uplifted, he, as through an instrument, Blew mimic hootings...echoes loud, Redoubled and redoubled, concourse wild Of jocund din; and, when a lengthened pause Of silence came and baffled his best skill, With all its solemn...
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