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" The state of slavery is of such a nature that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons, moral or political, but only [by] positive law, which preserves its force long after the reasons, occasion, and time itself, from whence it was created,... "
A Complete Collection of State Trials Vol. XX - Page 81
by T. B. Howell, Esq. - 1816
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The Unconstitutionality of Slavery, Part 2

Lysander Spooner - Slavery - 1845 - 156 pages
...such a nature, that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons, moral or political—but only positive law, which preserves its force long after...itself from whence it was created, is erased from the memory. It is so odious that nothing can be suffered to support it but positive law. '* Slavery,...
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The Unconstitutionality of Slavery, Part 2

Lysander Spooner - Slavery - 1845 - 156 pages
...the law of the country where it is used. * * * The state of slavery is of such a nature, that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons, moral or political — but only positive law, which preserves its force long after the reasons, occasion, and time itself from whence...
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The Massachusetts Quarterly Review, Volume 1

1848
...Lord Mansfield uses the following language : " The state of slavery is of such a nature that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons, moral or political, but only positive law, which preserves its force long after the reasons, occasion, and time iteelf from whence...
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The History of the United States of America, Volume 2

Richard Hildreth - United States - 1849
...been exceedingly different in different conntries. The state of slavery is of such a nature that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons moral...which preserves its force long after the reasons, occasions, and time itself from whence it was created is erased from memory. It is so odious that nothing...
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Report of the Committee on Slavery, to the Convention of Congregational ...

Slavery - 1849 - 92 pages
...they have had occasion to speak of slavery, uniformly say, — " It is of such a nature, that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons, moral or political, but only provisions of law ; and it is so odious, that nothing can be suffered to support it, but positive law."...
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Reports of Cases in Law and Equity, Argued and Determined in the ..., Volume 9

Georgia. Supreme Court - Equity - 1851
...Ncal va. Fannur. facto, a freeman. " The state of slavery, said he, is of such a nature, that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons, moral or political, but only by positive law — it is so odious, that nothing can be suffered to support it but positive law." 20 Stale Tr. 80....
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Freedom National; Slavery Sectional

Charles Sumner - Fugitive slave law of 1850 - 1852 - 78 pages
...Lord Mansfield, pronouncing judgment in the great case of Somersett, " is of such a nature, that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons moral or political, but only by positive law. It is so odious, that nothing can be suffered to support it but POSITIVE LAW." (Howell's State Trials,...
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Five Hundred Thousand Strokes for Freedom: A Series of Anti-slavery ..., Issue 2

Antislavery movements - 1853 - 352 pages
...forfeits it by some crime." — Lord Chesterfield, 1694-1773. " Slavery is of such a nature, that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons moral or political, but only by positive law. It is so odious, that nothing can be suffered to support it but positive law." — Judgment in the...
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Commentaries Upon International Law, Volume 1

Sir Robert Phillimore - International law - 1854
...been extremely different in different countries. The state of shivery is of such a nature that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons, moral...reasons, occasion, and time itself from whence *it was ever created is erased from гоотт memory. It is so odious that nothing can support it but positive...
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COMMENTARIES UPON INTERNATIONAL LAW.

ROBERT PHILLIMORE, M.P. - 1854
...been extremely different in different countries. The state of slavery is of such a nature that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons, moral...reasons, occasion, and time itself from whence *it was ever created is erased from memory. It is so odious that nothing can support it but positive law. Whatever...
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