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" The state of slavery is of such a nature that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons, moral or political, but only [by] positive law, which preserves its force long after the reasons, occasion, and time itself, from whence it was created,... "
A Complete Collection of State Trials Vol. XX - Page 81
by T. B. Howell, Esq. - 1816
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Abraham Lincoln and the Men of His Time, Volume 1

Robert Henry Browne - United States - 1901
...been extremely different in different countries. The state of slavery is of such a nature that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons moral...which preserves its force long after the reasons, occasions, and time itself from where it was created are erased from memory. It is so odious that nothing...
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Golden Jubilee of the Republican Party: The Celebration in Philadelphia ...

Addison B. Burk, Howard A. Chase, J. Lee Patton, Hampton Moor - 1906 - 226 pages
...been extremely different in different countries. The state of slavery is of such a nature that it is incapable of being introduced, on any reasons moral or political but only positive law, which preserves the force long after the reasons, occasion, and time itself from whence...
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Select Documents of English Constitutional History

George Burton Adams, Henry Morse Stephens - Constitutional history - 1906 - 555 pages
...been extremely different, in different countries. The state of slavery is of such a nature, that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons, moral or political, but only bv positive law, which preserves its force long after the reasons, occasion, and time itself from whence...
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A Shorter Selection of Cases on the Conflict of Laws

Joseph Henry Beale - Conflict of laws - 1907 - 828 pages
...been extremely different in different countries. The state of slavery is of such a nature that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons, moral or political, but only positive law, which preserves its force long after the reasons, occasion, and time itself from whence...
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A History of the United States and Its People: From Their Earliest ..., Volume 5

Elroy McKendree Avery - United States - 1908
...municipal law William, Lord Mansfield of England. . . . The state of slavery is of such a nature that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons moral or political, but only by a positive law. . . . It is so odious that nothing can be suffered to support it but positive law....
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The Anti-slavery Reporter

Slavery - 1876
...nature that it is incapable of being introdued on any reasons, moral or political, but only by positivo law, which preserves its force long after the reasons, occasion, and time itself, from whence it was ever created, is erased from memory." — Howell's "State Trials," Vol. XX., p. 82. The most emphatic...
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The Anti-slavery Reporter

Slavery - 1860
...AlansŻeld, pronouncing jndgment in the great case of Somersett, s' is of such a nature that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons, moral or political, but only by positive law. It is so odious, that nothing can be suffered to support it but POSITIVE LAW" — that is, express...
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Great Debates in American History: The Civil War

Marion Mills Miller - History - 1913
...in the memorable case of Sommersett, said : ' ' The state of slavery is of such a nature that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons, moral or political, but only by positive law. It is so odious that nothing can be suffered to support it but positive law." (Howell's "State Trials,"...
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Building the American Nation

Nicholas Murray Butler, Sir George Watson Foundation for American History, Literature, and Institutions - United States - 1923 - 375 pages
...such a nature, that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons, moral or political; but only positive law, which preserves its force long after...from whence it was created, is erased from memory: It's so odious, that nothing can be suffered to support it, but positive law. Whatever inconveniences,...
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Building the American Nation: An Essay of Interpretation

Nicholas Murray Butler - United States - 1923 - 375 pages
...been extremely different, in different countries. The state of slavery is of such a nature, that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons, moral or political; but only positive law, which preserves its force long after the reasons, occasion, and time itself from whence...
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