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" Not where he eats, but where he is eaten : a certain convocation of politic worms are e'en at him. Your worm is your only emperor for diet : we fat all creatures else to fat us, and we fat ourselves for maggots : your fat king and your lean beggar is... "
Great Truths by great Authors - Page 274
1856
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The First Quarto of Hamlet

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1999 - 144 pages
...guts of a beggar'. Three Q2 lines were apparently inadvertently omitted in F: KING. Alas, alas! HAM. A man may fish with the worm that hath eat of a king, and eat of the fish that hath fed of that worm. (4.3.26-8) Of the three earliest texts, QI'S version of these lines seems the clearest, as only QI...
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Angler's Journal

Erin Murphy - 1999 - 160 pages
...Catching average trout from average streams may be a lousy job, but someone has to do it. — John Gierach A man may fish with the worm that hath eat of a king, and eat of the fish that hath fed of that worm. — William Shakespeare One cannot step twice into the same river. — Herakleitos The truth is, fly...
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Historicism, Psychoanalysis, and Early Modern Culture

Carla Mazzio - History - 2000 - 417 pages
...Not where he eats, but where a is eaten. A certain convocation of politic worms are e'en at him. Your worm is your only emperor for diet: we fat all creatures...beggar is but variable service — two dishes, but one table. That's the end. King. Alas, alas. Ham. A man may fish with the worm that hath eat of a king,...
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Practicing New Historicism

Catherine Gallagher, Stephen Greenblatt - History - 2001 - 249 pages
...and revulsion, an obsession with a corporeality that reduces everything to appetite and excretion. "We fat all creatures else to fat us, and we fat ourselves...— two dishes, but to one table. That's the end" (4.3.22-25). Here, as in the lines about the king's progress through the guts of a beggar, the revulsion...
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Hamlet

William Shakespeare - 2000 - 336 pages
...Claudius sense a threat to himself in Hamlet's word-play concerning maggots, kings and beggars? SCENE 3 fat all creatures else to fat us, and we fat ourselves...beggar is but variable service, two dishes, but to one 25 table - that's the end. KING Alas, alas! HAMLET A man may fish with the worm that hath eat of a...
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Practicing New Historicism

Catherine Gallagher, Stephen Greenblatt, Stephen Greenblatt, PH D - History - 2000 - 249 pages
...and revulsion, an obsession with a corporeality that reduces everything to appetite and excretion. "We fat all creatures else to fat us, and we fat ourselves...Your fat king and your lean beggar is but variable service—two dishes, but to one table. That's the end" (4.3.22-25). Here, as in the lines about the...
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Historicism, Psychoanalysis, and Early Modern Culture

Carla Mazzio - History - 2000 - 417 pages
...beggar is but variable service — two dishes, but one table. That's the end. King. Alas, alas. Ham. A man may fish with the worm that hath eat of a king, and eat of the fish that hath fed of that worm. King. What dost thou mean by this? Ham. Nothing but to show you how a king may go a progress through...
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Food: A Dictionary of Literal and Nonliteral Terms

Robert Allen Palmatier - Reference - 2000 - 461 pages
...eaten." (Hamlet then gives a description of a "cyclic," rather than a "ladder," food chain.) Hamlet: "A man may fish with the worm that hath eat of a king, and eat of the fish that hath fed of that worm." In spite of the allusion to fishing, the "worm" that feeds on dead bodies is not an angleworm but a...
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Shakespeare's Brain: Reading with Cognitive Theory

Mary Thomas Crane - Literary Criticism - 2010 - 288 pages
...told Claudius that Polonius was "at supper. . . . Not where he eats, but where 'a is eaten" and that "A man may fish with the worm that hath eat of a king, and eat of the fish that hath fed of that worm," so that "a king may go a progress through the guts of a beggar" (4.3.17-19, 27-29, 30-31).42 Now the...
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The Vanishing: Shakespeare, the Subject, and Early Modern Culture

Christopher Pye, Class of 1924 Professor of English at Williams College Christopher Pye - Literary Criticism - 2000 - 199 pages
...fantasy in which political and symbolic incorporation becomes indistinguishable from excretion: Hamlet: A man may fish with the worm that hath eat of a king, and eat of the fish that hath fed of that worm. King: What dost thou mean by this? Hamlet: Nothing but to show you how a king may go a progress through...
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