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" Old Law did save, And such as yet once more I trust to have Full sight of her in Heaven without restraint, Came vested all in white, pure as her mind. Her face was veiled ; yet to my fancied sight Love, sweetness, goodness, in her person shined So clear... "
John Milton: His Life and Times, Religious and Political Opinions: With an ... - Page 164
by Joseph Ivimey - 1833 - 397 pages
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The Poetical Works of John Milton: With a Memoir, and Critical ..., Volume 2

John Milton - 1843
...did save, And such, as yet once more I trust to have Full sight of her in heaven without restraint, Came vested all in white, pure as her mind : Her face was veil'd, yet, to my fancied sight, Love, sweetness, goodness, in her person shined So clear, as in no...
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English poetry, for use in the schools of the Collegiate institution ...

English poetry - 1844
...did save, And such, as yet once more I trust to have Full sight of her in heaven without restraint, Came vested all in white, pure as her mind: Her face...shined So clear, as in no face with more delight. But, 0 ! as to embrace me she inclined, I waked; she fled; and day brought back my night. SPEECH AND SONG...
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Lives of Celebrated American Indians

Samuel Griswold Goodrich - Indians - 1844 - 315 pages
...saint, ****## And such as yet once more I trust to have Full sight of her in heaven, without restraint, Came vested all in white, pure as her mind. Her face...fancied sight Love, sweetness, goodness in her person shin'd So clear as in no face with mor^delight. But oh, as to embrace me she incliu'd I waked, she...
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Famous Men of Modern Times, Volume 1

Samuel Griswold Goodrich - Biography - 1844 - 315 pages
...saint, ****** And such as yet once more I trust to hare Full sight of her in heaven, without restraint, Came vested all in white, pure as her mind. Her face...fancied sight Love, sweetness, goodness in her person shin'd So clear as in no face with mor^delight. But oh, as to embrace me she inclin'd I waked, she...
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Aischulou Agamemnōn. The Agamemnon of Aeschylus, a new ed. of the text, with ...

Aeschylus - 1844
...тге'^офос albas, Stippl. 579." Klausen. Blomfield compares Eur. Alcest. 354. Milton, Sonnet xviii. But О ! as to embrace me she inclined, I waked she fled ; and day brought back my night. s Klausen translates iroff' 'Афрой(та. х"тта omne amnris gaiidium, and quotes Eur. t Compare...
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Famous Men of Modern Times, Volume 1

Samuel Griswold Goodrich - Authors - 1844 - 288 pages
...her mind. Her face was veiled, yet to my fancied sight Love, sweetness, goodness in her person shin'd So clear as in no face with more delight. But oh, as to embrace me she inclin'd I waked, she fled, and day brought back my night." Milton received his appointment previous...
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The Guide to Knowledge, Or Repertory of Facts: Forming a Complete Library of ...

Robert Sears - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1844 - 484 pages
...mind : Her face was veil'd, yet to my fancied sight, Love, sweetness, goonness in her person shin'd So clear as in no face with more delight, But oh, as to embrace me she inclin'u, I wak'd, she lied, aml day brought back my night." To feel the ftdl pathos of the last line,...
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The Indicatior: a Miscellany for the Fields and the Fireside

Leigh Hunt - 1845
...called conceit in poetry, is that termination of Milton's sonnet on dreaming of his deceased wife, — But oh, as to embrace me she inclined, I waked ; she fled ; and day brought back my night. It is strange that so good and cordial a critic as Warton should think this a mere conceit on his blindness....
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The Indicator: A Miscellany for the Fields and the Fireside, Volume 2

Leigh Hunt - 1845 - 495 pages
...called conceit in poetry, is that termination of Milton's sonnet on dreaming of his deceased wife,— But oh, as to embrace me she inclined, I waked; she fled; and day brought back my night. It is strange that so good and cordial a critic as Warton should think this a mere conceit on his blindness....
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The Indicatior: a Miscellany for the Fields and the Fireside

Leigh Hunt - 1845
...called conceit in poetry, is that termination of Milton's sonnet on dreaming of his deceased wife, — But oh, as to embrace me she inclined, I waked ; she fled ; and day brought back my night. It is strange that so good and cordial a critic as Warton should think this a mere conceit on his blindness....
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