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" Nor is there much satisfaction in contemplating the world with nothing left to the spontaneous activity of nature ; with every rood of land brought into cultivation which is capable of growing food for human beings ; every flowery waste or natural pasture... "
Valuing the Earth, second edition: Economics, Ecology, Ethics - Page 28
edited by - 1992 - 399 pages
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The History of Economic Thought: A Reader

Steven G. Medema, Warren J. Samuels - Business & Economics - 2003 - 668 pages
...and aspirations which are not only good for the individual, but which society could ill do without. Nor is there much satisfaction in contemplating the...human beings; every flowery waste or natural pasture ploughed up, all quadrupeds or birds which are not domesticated for man's use exterminated as his rivals...
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Principles of Political Economy (Abridged): With Some of Their Applications ...

John Stuart Mill, Stephen Nathanson - Business & Economics - 352 pages
...and aspirations which are not only good for the individual, but which society could ill do without. Nor is there much satisfaction in contemplating the...nothing left to the spontaneous activity of nature; with everv rood of land brought into cultivation, which is capable of growing food for human beings; every...
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Friedrich A. Hayek: 2nd series

John Cunningham Wood, Robert D. Wood - Economics - 2004 - 448 pages
...the presence of his species. A world from which solitude is extirpated, is a very poor ideal. . . . Nor is there much satisfaction in contemplating the...world with nothing left to the spontaneous activity of nature."59 But why, then, do I consider Hayek's revision of Bentham (from the Greatest Happiness of...
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Adam Smith's Moral Philosophy: A Historical and Contemporary Perspective on ...

Jerry Evensky - Business & Economics - 2005
...satisfaction in contemplating the world with nothing left to spontaneous activity of nature; with every rod of land brought into cultivation, which is capable...human beings; every flowery waste or natural pasture ploughed up, all quadrupeds or birds which are not domesticated for man's use exterminated as rivals...
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The Economy of the Earth: Philosophy, Law, and the Environment

Mark Sagoff - Philosophy - 2007
...instrumental value. More than a century ago, as England lost its last wild places, Mill condemned a world with nothing left to the spontaneous activity...human beings; every flowery waste or natural pasture ploughed up; all quadrupeds or birds which are not domesticated for man's use exterminated as his rivals...
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Ecological Economics and Sustainable Development

Herman E. Daly - Business & Economics - 2007 - 288 pages
...at all times in the presence of his species . . . Nor is their much satisfaction in contemplating a world with nothing left to the spontaneous activity...nature; with every rood of land brought into cultivation . . . every flowery waste or natural pasture plowed up, all quadrupeds or birds which are not domesticated...
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Ethics and the Environment: An Introduction

Dale Jamieson - Philosophy - 2008
...solitude in the presence of natural beauty and grandeur, is the cradle of thought and aspirations . . . Nor is there much satisfaction in contemplating the...nature; with every rood of land brought into cultivation . . . every flowery waste or natural pasture ploughed up, all quadrupeds or birds which are not domesticated...
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Culture, Creativity and Environment: New Environmentalist Criticism

Fiona Becket, Terry Gifford - Literary Criticism - 2007 - 258 pages
...and aspirations which are not only good for the individual, but which society could ill do without. Nor is there much satisfaction in contemplating the...human beings; every flowery waste or natural pasture ploughed up, all quadrupeds or birds which are not domesticated for man's use exterminated as his rivals...
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