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" This England never did, (nor never shall,) Lie at the proud foot of a conqueror, But when it first did help to wound itself. Now these her princes are come home again, Come the three corners of the world in arms, And we shall shock them : Nought shall... "
Many thoughts of many minds. Compiled by H. Southgate - Page 181
edited by - 1862
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King John: New Perspectives

Deborah T. Curren-Aquino - Literary Criticism - 1989 - 205 pages
...sustained borrowing in Shakespeare's text), the Bastard pronounces the lesson of Tudor homilies: This England never did, nor never shall, Lie at the proud...conqueror. But when it first did help to wound itself. .... Nought shall make us rue, If England to itself do rest but true! (5.7.112-18) This signifies closure....
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Images of Englishmen and Foreigners in the Drama of Shakespeare and His ...

A. J. Hoenselaars, Ton Hoenselaars - Drama - 1992 - 347 pages
...reference to other, foreign nations is conveyed in Faulconbridge's famous lines that end the history: This England never did, nor never shall, Lie at the proud...make us rue If England to itself do rest but true! 19 His conditional "if" is appropriate, pointing back as it does to the preceding period of complex...
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Shakespeare the Playwright: A Companion to the Complete Tragedies, Histories ...

Victor L. Cahn - Drama - 1996 - 865 pages
...speech suggests that even when Henry becomes King, the Bastard will embody the spirit of kingship: This England never did, nor never shall. Lie at the proud...make us rue. If England to itself do rest but true. (V, vii, 112-118) His speech brings out the thematic core of the play. England is united, but because...
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The Complete Works of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1996 - 1263 pages
...BASTARD. O, let us pay the time but needful woe, Since it hath been beforehand with our griefs. — This For that Joh 3 naught shall make us rue, If England to itself do rest but true. [Exeunt. THE TAMING OF THE SHREW DRAMATIS...
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Free Trade: 1793-1886, Volume 4

Lars Magnusson - Commerce - 1997 - 4 pages
...native labour, and native energy, enterprise, and intellect, fair play and then in industry, as in arms: Come the three corners of the world in arms, And we...make us rue, If England to itself do rest but true. Commerce is merely the handmaid of industry. The proper sphere of commerce is to distribute industrial...
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Engendering a Nation: A Feminist Account of Shakespeare's English Histories

Jean E Howard, PH D, Jean Elizabeth Howard, Phyllis Rackin, Professor Department of English Phyllis Rackin, T. L. J. HOWARD - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 248 pages
...true subjection everlastingly" (104—5) to the new king and proclaiming the jingoistic moral: This England never did, nor never shall, Lie at the proud...conqueror, But when it first did help to wound itself. Nought shall make us rue If England to itself do rest but true. (V.vii.112-18) As many critics have...
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The Genius of Shakespeare

Jonathan Bate - Literary Criticism - 1998 - 384 pages
...Shakespeare. His quotations included 'the never-to-beforgotten words' which close King John ('This England, never did, nor never shall, / Lie at the...conqueror, / But when it first did help to wound itself), the 'imperishable' praise of England from the lips of the dying John of Gaunt in Richard II, and a...
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Shakespeare's Dramatic Genres

Lawrence Danson, Lawrence (Professor of English Danson, Professor of English Princeton University) - Drama - 2000 - 160 pages
...son, he sounds less like the selfish Edmond than like the prophetic John of Gaunt in Richard II: This England never did, nor never shall, Lie at the proud...conqueror But when it first did help to wound itself Naught shall make us rue If England to itself do rest but true. (5. 7. 112-14, 117-18) It's a rousing...
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The Plays of Shakespeare: A Thematic Guide

Victor L. Cahn - Drama - 2001 - 361 pages
...127-158). Indeed, it is the Bastard who, after John's death, states in the final words of the play: This England never did, nor never shall, Lie at the proud...make us rue, If England to itself do rest but true. (V, vii, 112-118) The Bastard never takes the throne, but his patriotic tone rallies the spirit of...
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Lectures Upon Shakspeare

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 2001
...famous by their birth. Ac. Add the famous passage in King John : — This England never did, nor ever shall, Lie at the proud foot of a conqueror, But when...corners of the world in arms, And we shall shock them : naught shall make us rue, If England to itself do rest but true. And it certainly seems that Shakspeare's...
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