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" How can they say that nature Has nothing made in vain; Why then beneath the water Should hideous rocks remain? No eyes the rocks discover, That lurk beneath the deep, To wreck the wand'ring lover, And leave the maid to weep. "
Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern - Page 6249
edited by - 1896
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The Poetical Common-place Book: Consisting of an Original Selection of ...

Poetical common-place book - English poetry - 1822 - 388 pages
...! what's thy troubled motion To that within y breast ? " The merchant, robb'd of pleasure, Views tempests in despair ; But what's the loss of treasure...can they say that nature Has nothing made in vain ? No eyes the rocks discover, That lurk beneath the deep, To wreck the wand'ring lover, And leave the...
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The British Poets: Including Translations ...

British poets - Classical poetry - 1822
...treasure To losing of my dear? Should you some coast be laid on Where gold and diamonds grow, You '11 find a richer maiden, But none that loves you so....can they say that Nature Has nothing made in vain ; No eyes those rocks discover, That lurk beneath the deep, To wreck the wandering lover, And leave...
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Gay's Fables and Other Poems: Cotton's Visions in Verse ; Moore's Fables for ...

John Gay - English poetry - 1826 - 354 pages
...be laid on Where gold and diamonds grow, You'd find a richer maiden, But none that loves yon so. IV. How can they say that nature Has nothing made in vain...wreck the wandering lover, And leave the maid to weep. V. All melancholy lying, Thus wail'd she for her dear ; Repaid each blast with sighing, Each billow...
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The songs of England and Scotland

England - 1835
...what's thy troubled motion 164 SONG6 OF ENGLAND AND IRELAND. The merchant robb'd of pleasure Views tempests in despair ; But what's the loss of treasure...nothing made in vain ; Why then beneath the water Do hideous rocks remain ? No eyes those rocks discover, That lurk beneath the deep, To wreck the wand'ring...
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The Songs of England and Scotland ...

Peter Cunningham - Ballads, English - 1835
...; Ah ! what's thy troubled motion To that within my breast ? The merchant robb'd of pleasure Views tempests in despair ; But what's the loss of treasure...can they say that nature Has nothing made in vain j Why then beneath the water Do hideous rocks remain ? No eyes those rocks discover, That lurk beneath...
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A Garland of Love, Wreathed of Pleasant Flowers, Gathered in the Field of ...

Garland - English poetry - 1836 - 219 pages
...losing of my dear ? Should you some coast be laid on, Where gold and diamonds grow, You may find some richer maiden, But none that loves you so. ' ' How...nothing made in vain ? Why, then, beneath the water Do hideous rocks remain ? No eyes those rocks discover, That lurk beneath the deep, To wreck the wandering...
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The Works of James Harris, Esq

James Harris - Philosophy, Modern - 1841 - 584 pages
...in one of our most elegant modern ballads ; though whence the poet took it, I pretend not to decide. How can they say, that nature Has nothing made in vain ? Why then beneath the water Do hideous rocks remain ? Those rocks no eyes discover, Which lurk beneath the deep, To wreck, &....
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The Works Of James Harris, Esq: With An Account Of His Life And Character By ...

James Harris - 1841
...iu one of our most elegant modern ballads ; though whence the poet took it, I pretend not to decide. How can they say, that nature Has nothing made in vain ? Why then beneath the water Do hideous rocks remain ? Those rocks no eyes discover, Which lurk beneath the deep, To wreck, &C....
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Select Works of the British Poets: In a Chronological Series from Ben Jonson ...

John Aikin - English poetry - 1843 - 807 pages
...treasure, To losing of my dear ? Sould you some coast be laid on, Where gold and diamonds grow, You 'd d : as when the Sun, new risen, Looks through the...Moon. In dim eclipse, disastrous* twilight sheds AH melancholy lying, Thus wnil'd she for her dear; Repaid each blast with sighing. Each billow with...
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The Prose and Poetry of Europe and America: Consisting of Literary Gems and ...

American literature - 1845 - 600 pages
...be laid on, Where gold ar: diamonds grow, You may find some, richer maiden, But nont tt.it loves yon — he felt a charm in these scenes, so lovely and oo new 1 Why, then, beneath the water Do hideous rocks remain ? No eyes those rocks discover, That lurk beneath...
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