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Books Books 11 - 20 of 180 on We look before and after, And pine for what is not: Our sincerest laughter With some....
" We look before and after, And pine for what is not: Our sincerest laughter With some pain is fraught; Our sweetest songs are those that tell of saddest thought. Yet if we could scorn Hate, and pride, and fear; If we were things born Not to shed a tear,... "
The Oxford Book of English Verse, 1250-1900 - Page 697
edited by - 1902 - 1084 pages
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Cyclopędia of English Literature: A History, Critical and ..., Volume 2

Robert Chambers - English literature - 1844
...Better than all measures Of delight and sound, Better than all treasures That in books are found, Thv lands fade that Spring so lately wove ; Each simple flower, which she had nursed in dew, Anemonies [From ' The Scnsitire Plant.'] A Sensitive Plant in a garden grew, And the young winds fed it with...
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Imagination and Fancy: Or, Selections from the English Poets, Illustrative ...

Leigh Hunt - ENGLISH POETRY (SELECTIONS: EXTRACTS, ETC.) - 1845 - 255 pages
...such a crystal stream ? We look before and afier, And pine for what is not ; Our sincerest laughter Yet if we could scorn Hate and pride and fear; If...Thy skill to poet were, thou scorner of the ground! 3 Teach me half the gladness, That thy brain must know; Such harmonious madness From my lips would...
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The Book of Gems: Wordsworth to Bayley

Samuel Carter Hall - English poetry - 1846
...a flood of rapture so divine. Chorus Hymeneal, Or triumphal chaunt, Match'd with thine would be all What objects are the fountains Of thy happy strain...The world should listen then, as I am listening now. SA-.HI!T, TAYLOR CoLEHiDGB was born on the 20th of October, 1772, at Ottery St. Mary, in Devonshire....
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Poetry for Home and School ...

1846
...how could thy notes flow in such a crystal stream ? I«W TBE PRISONER OF CHILLON. We look before and after, And pine for what is not : Our sincerest laughter...The world should listen then, as I am listening now. THE PRISONER OF CHILLON. — Byron. SONNET ON CHILLON. ETERNAL spirit of the chainless mind ! Brightest...
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The Gem book of poesie, by the author of 'The ancient poets and poetry of ...

Gem book - 1846 - 160 pages
...sincerest laughter With some pain is fraught ; [thought. Our sweetest songs are those that tell of saddest Yet if we could scorn Hate, and pride, and fear, —...Thy skill to poet were, thou scorner of the ground ! PB SHELLEY. SKYLARK. BIRD of the wilderness Blithsome and cumberless, Light be thy matin o'er moorland...
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Half-hours with the best authors, selected by C. Knight, Volume 1

Half hours - 1847
...scorn Hate, and pride, and fear ; If we were things born Not to shed a tear, I know not how thy joys we ever should come near. Better than all measures...world should listen then, as I am listening now." SHELLEY. 59.— GIFFORD'S ACCOUNT OF HIS EARLY DAYS. [THE history of men who have overleaped " poverty's...
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The Genius of Scotland: Or Sketches of Scottish Scenery, Literature and Religion

Robert Turnbull - Scotland - 1847 - 379 pages
...sincerest laughter, With some pain is fraught : Our sweetest songs are those which tell of saddest thought. Better than all measures Of delightful sound, Better...The world should listen then, as I am listening now. Inferior to this, but still very beautiful, more natural, and more especially Scottish, are the following...
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The Poetical Works of Coleridge, Shelley, and Keats: complete in one volume

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 1847 - 607 pages
...saddest thought. Yet if we could scorn Hate, and pride, and fear. If we were things bom Not to ahed a tear, I know not how thy joy we ever should come...That in books are found, Thy skill to poet were, thou scomer of the ground Teach me half the gladness That thy brain must know, Such harmonious madness From...
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The Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley, Volume 1

Percy Bysshe Shelley - Poets, English - 1849
...tell of saddest thought. XIX. Yet if we could scorn Hnte, and pride, and fear ; If we were tilings born Not to shed a tear, I know not how thy joy we...That in books are found. Thy skill to poet were, thou scorncr of the ground ! XXI. Teach me half the gladness That thy bram must know, Such harmonious madness...
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Select English poetry, with notes by E. Hughes

Edward Hughes - 1851
...annoyance Never came near thee : Thou lovest ; but ne'er knew love's sad satiety. THE SKYLARK. 227 Waking or asleep, Thou of death must deem Things more...Thy skill to poet were, thou scorner of the ground ! 8 Teach me half the gladness That thy brain must know, Such harmonious madness From my lips would...
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