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" There is a great deal of difference between an innate law, and a law of nature between something imprinted on our minds in their very original, and something that we, being ignorant of, may attain to the knowledge of, by the use and due application of... "
The London Encyclopaedia: Or, Universal Dictionary of Science, Art ... - Page 105
edited by - 1829
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Contemporary Newtonian Research

Z. Bechler, Zev Bechler, D. Reidel Publishing Company - History - 1982 - 241 pages
...saw the moral categories as a product of the will of God whose moral law, as Locke expressed it, we "may attain to the knowledge of, by the use and due application of our natural faculties".65 Entirely at one with this Newton could write at the end of the Opticks: "And if natural...
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British Moralists, 1650-1800: Hobbes

David Daiches Raphael - Philosophy - 1991 - 431 pages
...here mistaken, as if, because I deny an innate law, I thought there were none but positive laws. There is a great deal of difference between an innate law,...faculties. And I think they equally forsake the truth, who running into the contrary extremes, either affirm an innate law, or deny that there is a law, knowable...
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Greece, Rome, and the Bill of Rights

Susan Ford Wiltshire - Political Science - 1992 - 247 pages
...the passage in which he attacks innate ideas, he explicitly upholds his belief in natural law: "There is a great deal of difference between an innate law...nature; between something imprinted on our minds in the very original and something that we, being ignorant of, may attain to the knowledge of, by the...
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The Lockean Theory of Rights

A. John Simmons - Philosophy - 1994 - 387 pages
...30-31). The primary sense in which natural law is natural for Locke, is simply that it is a law we "may attain to the knowledge of, by the use and due application of our natural faculties" (E, 1.2.13). While Locke does mention "the rule of living according to nature," he makes it clear that...
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The Useful Cobbler: Edmund Burke and the Politics of Progress

James Conniff - Political Science - 1994 - 363 pages
...be mistaken, as if, because I deny an innate law, I thought there were none but positive laws. There is a great deal of difference between an innate law...use and due application of our natural faculties." 15 Locke believed that moral principles, as instances of rational demonstrations, could be conclusively...
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John Locke: Critical Assessments, Volume 1

Richard Ashcraft - Reference - 1991 - 715 pages
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John Locke and the Ethics of Belief

Nicholas Wolterstorff, Noah Porter Professor Emeritus of Philosophical Theology Nicholas Wolterstorff - Philosophy - 1996 - 248 pages
...summarizing his discussion of how authentic knowledge of moral obligation is attainable, he says that "There is a great deal of difference between an innate law,...something that we being ignorant of may attain to the knowlege of, by the use and due application of our natural faculties. And I think they equally forsake...
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

John Locke, Kenneth Winkler - Philosophy - 1996 - 416 pages
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The works of John Locke

John Locke - 1997
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John Locke, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding in Focus

John Locke - Philosophy - 2000 - 282 pages
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