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" This is a mere matter of the moment : I think I shall be among the English Poets after my death. Even as a matter of present interest, the attempt to crush me in The Quarterly has only brought me more into notice, and it is a common expression among bookmen,... "
Lives of the Illustrious: (the Biographical Magazine). - Page 268
1852
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English Literature

Roy Bennett Pace - English literature - 1918 - 397 pages
...than that in which he penned his epitaph, Keats had himself expressed confidence in his future : " I think I shall be among the English poets after my death." No one to-day would think of questioning the fulfilment of his belief. Keats's Artistry and Character....
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A Letter Book: Selected with an Introduction on the History and Art of ...

George Saintsbury - English letters - 1922 - 306 pages
...by Reynolds. I do not know who wrote those in the Chronicle. This is a mere matter of the moment— I think I shall be among the English Poets after my...expression among book-men, " I wonder the Quarterly should cut its own throat." It does me not the least harm in Society to make me appear little and ridiculous...
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First Essays on Literature

Edward Shanks - English literature - 1923 - 267 pages
...complain, because I am certain anything really fine will in these days be felt." He says again that " the attempt to crush me in the Quarterly has only brought me more into notice "; and Reynolds fully expresses the true significance of the whole affair when he assures his friend that...
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A First View of English Literature

William Vaughn Moody, Robert Morss Lovett - American literature - 1923 - 424 pages
...whose name was writ in water." In a hopefuller time and in a mood of noble simplicity, he had said, " I think I shall be among the English poets after my death." Keats as a Man. — Keats 's appearance is thus summed-up by one of his later biographers, from the...
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Books and Authors

Robert Lynd - Authors - 1923 - 312 pages
...effeminate Keats, as the effeminate Keats is the true answer to the manly Keats. The Keats who said : "I think I shall be among the English poets after my death," and the Keats who was "snuffed out by an article" similarly answer one another; and the Keats of The...
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Bare Souls

Gamaliel Bradford - Authors - 1924 - 340 pages
...the simple worship of a day." 89 And it is with a fine, high, confident security that he declares: "I think I shall be among the English Poets after my death." 40 At any rate, whether one cared for fame or not, one could labor to deserve it, to do things that...
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The Making of English Literature

William Henry Crawshaw - English literature - 1924 - 536 pages
...applied to all Keats's poetry. Feeling the powers that were still undeveloped within him, he once said, " I think I shall be among the English poets after my death.' Matthew Arnold adds, " He is ; he is with Shakespeare.' So far we have been dealing mainly with the...
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John Keats

Walter Jackson Bate - Biography & Autobiography - 2009 - 780 pages
...after mentioning the attacks of Blackwood's and the Quarterly: "This is a mere matter of the moment— I think I shall be among the English Poets after my...more into notice and it is a common expression among book men, 'I wonder the Quarterly should cut its own throat.' It does me not the least harm in Society...
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John Keats

John Barnard, Barnard John - Literary Collections - 1987 - 172 pages
...263). Even the apparently confident prediction to his brother and sister-in-law made in October 1818, 'I think I shall be among the English Poets after my death' (Letters, i. 394), was a response to the vituperative review in Blackwood's Magazine. For Keats 'Fame'...
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The Argonaut, Volume 5

Arts - 1875
...than this despairing sentiment, was the hope Keats expressed in a letter to his brother George : " I think I shall be among the English Poets after my death." His name, indeed, is not " writ in water," but deep and indelible in the enduring marble. When he no...
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