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" This is a mere matter of the moment : I think I shall be among the English Poets after my death. Even as a matter of present interest, the attempt to crush me in The Quarterly has only brought me more into notice, and it is a common expression among bookmen,... "
Lives of the Illustrious: (the Biographical Magazine). - Page 268
1852
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The Cambridge Companion to British Romanticism

Stuart Curran, Cambridge University Press, University of Cambridge - Literary Criticism - 1993 - 311 pages
...who in modern cultures would stake existence itself on the ambition of the twenty-two year old Keats: "I think I shall be among the English Poets after my death" (Letters, p. 161: October 14, 1818)? Why, in other words, should poetry have so mattered to the culture...
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The Works of John Keats: With an Introduction and Bibliography

John Keats - Poetry - 1994 - 491 pages
...ambition, expressed in one final extract from a letter to his brother George, written in October 1818: 'I think I shall be among the English Poets after my death' (Letters, 1:394). DR PAUL WRIGHT Trinity College, Carmarthen Bibliography For the letters of John Keats,...
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Keats, Narrative and Audience: The Posthumous Life of Writing

Andrew Bennett - Literary Criticism - 1994 - 254 pages
...sojourning', 'Bards of passion and of Mirth'; and in comments in letters such as the statement that 'I think I shall be among the English Poets after my death' (Letters, vol. i, p. 394), or more commonly his despair that 'If I should die ... I have left no immortal...
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The Ideology of Imagination: Subject and Society in the Discourse of Romanticism

Forest Pyle - Literary Criticism - 1995 - 225 pages
...1978), and are cited by line numbers. 23. This is how one might interpret Keats's prophetic remark — "I think I shall be among the English poets after my death" — against the grain of the aesthetic ideology it appears to embrace, however anxiously: like the...
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Virginia Woolf: The Critical Heritage

Robin Majumdar, Allen McLaurin - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 467 pages
...beyond what Blackwood or Quarterly could possibly inflict... This is a mere matter of the moment— I think I shall be among the English poets after my...the Quarterly has only brought me more into notice. Well: do I think I shall be among the English novelists after my death? I hardly ever think about it....
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The Possibilities of Society: Wordsworth, Coleridge, and the Sociological ...

Regina Hewitt - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 231 pages
...diverse audience through his poems, confident that they would eventually evoke a complementary response. "I think I shall be among the English Poets after my death," he commented in response to criticism of his work by The Quarterly Review (Letters 1: 394). His interest...
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Keats

Andrew Motion - Biography & Autobiography - 1999 - 636 pages
...This begins with a reference to his reviews, spurring him to a celebrated cry of selfconfidence - ' I think I shall be among the English Poets after my death' which indicates how well he understood the nature of their attack. 'It does me not the least harm in...
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Reading The Eve of St.Agnes: The Multiples of Complex Literary Transaction

Jack Stillinger - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 200 pages
...letter first appeared in print, in Milnes's Life of 1848: "This is a mere matter of the moment — I think I shall be among the English Poets after my death" (Letters 1:394). Outwardly, Keats might have seemed to his friends to have little reason for such a...
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I Could Tell You Stories: Sojourns in the Land of Memory

Patricia Hampl - Biography & Autobiography - 1999 - 229 pages
...mother is reminiscent of Keatss famous remark in a letter to his brother and sister-in-law in 1818: "I think I shall be among the English Poets after my death." Keats had his annus mirabilis (1818—19), as Plath had her miraculous autumn of 1962. Though Plath's...
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The Artist on the Artist

Harry Guest - Psychology - 2000 - 462 pages
...has glean'd my teeming brain" — yet in a letter to his brother in October 1818 he can show faith: "I think I shall be among the English Poets after my death." His last sonnet, written on a blank page facing A Lover's Complaint, bums with the wish to be as steadfast...
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