Learning Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora

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"O'Reilly Media, Inc.", 2004 - Computers - 326 pages

The GNU/Linux® success story is well known. Firmly established as a high-performance operating system, its worldwide installations are increasing at phenomenal rates. Much of this success has been on the server side, but more and more PC users are turning to Linux on the desktop, as well.

For those grounded in Microsoft Windows® or Apple Macintosh® graphical interfaces, the first look at a powerful Unix-style operating system can be daunting. This book provides a clear, no-nonsense introduction to the popular Red Hat® distribution of Linux. It takes you through installation and shows you the key parts of the system, always with an eye toward what can go wrong and what you need to know to get over the humps.

Linux is known as a secure environment and a good platform to run a web server. These topics are among the many covered in this book. But did you know you can also burn CDs, sync a PalmPilot™, and edit slideshow presentations with powerful tools on Linux? Those topics are covered here, too.

Red Hat currently provides two distributions, both documented in this book. The first is their commercial, subscription-based product, called Red Hat Enterprise Linux and also available through retail channels as Red Hat Professional Workstation. The second is the freely distributed Fedora distribution. The Publisher's Edition of Fedora is included in this book on two disks.

New in this edition are installation instructions for Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora, package updating for Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora, information on the GRUB bootloader, and the CUPS printer system.

Learning Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora tells you how to:

  • Prepare your system for installing Linux
  • Install and configure Linux and the two popular desktop environments, GNOME and KDE.
  • Run the most popular productivity tools on Linux: mailers, web browsers, OpenOffice, and Evolution.
  • Obtain and set up software through the Red Hat Package Manager (RPM)
  • Set up a Linux system for networking, either on your local area network (LAN), or via a dialup connection to the Internet.
  • Use the system-administration tools included with Red Hat, GNOME, and KDE, including such valuable utilities as Samba file-sharing and the Apache web server.
  • Understand and write shell scripts so you can peek under the hood and extend the power of Linux.
 

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Learning Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora

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Linux's popularity continues to grow owing to its lower cost and better security. Multiple flavors and uses of the OS lead to multiple guides; those listed here mainly cover the popular licensed Red ... Read full review

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The Definitive Guide to SUSE Linux Enterprise Server is a comprehensive guide to Novell's SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES), one of the most powerful Linux-based server solutions available today. Sander van Vugt, noted author, consultant, and trainer, guides you through the most important aspects of SLES, beginning with an in-depth overview of installation and configuration tasks. In the opening chapters, you will learn how to configure network capabilities, efficiently manage software updates, and manage the file system. Later chapters are devoted to configuration and deployment of key network services including the MySQL database, CUPS, Samba, PostFix, FTP, DNS, proxy servers, and more. Along the way, van Vugt illustrates important administration concepts such as instituting strict file system security and server automation. Since increasing demands are placed on these services, you’ll learn how to cluster servers together to lessen downtime and increase performance. 

Selected pages

Contents

Why Run Linux?
1
What Is Linux?
2
Reasons to Choose or Not Choose Linux
14
Preparing to Install Linux
16
Collecting Information About Your System
18
Preparing Your Hard Disk
24
Installing Linux
31
Start the Installation
32
Keeping Your Fedora Core System Up to Date
169
Configuring and Administering Linux
171
Administering Your System by Using the System Tools Menu
188
Controlling Services by Using the Server Settings Menu
195
Connecting to the Internet
200
Configuring an Internet Connection
201
The Mozilla Web Browser
214
gFTP FTP Client
217

The Firstboot Service
63
Logging into the Desktop
67
Getting Help
69
How Linux Works
72
How Linux Organizes Data
73
Using X
79
Using the GNOME and KDE Desktops
85
Using the GNOME Desktop
86
Using the KDE Desktop
98
Using Linux Applications
108
Evolution
117
PilotHandspring Tool
119
CD Creator
123
Conquering the bash Shell
125
Working with the Linux Command Prompt
128
Useful Linux Programs
146
Installing Software Using the RPM Package Manager
150
The redhatinstallpackages Command
154
The rpm Command
155
Querying the RPM Database
156
Installing a Package
157
Uninstalling a Package
160
Updating a Package
161
Advanced RPM Techniques
162
Using wvdial
218
Configuring Linux to Use a Cable or DSL Modem
219
Setting Up Network Services
221
Configuring Hosts
222
Samba
223
Running Apache
234
The Secure Shell
239
Implementing a Basic Firewall
244
Checking Your Security by Using Nmap
246
Network Security Tips
247
Advanced Shell Usage and Shell Scripts
248
Filename Globbing
249
Shell Aliases
251
Using Virtual Consoles
252
X and the Shell
253
Shell Scripts
255
Understanding Shell Scripts
263
Linux Directory Tree
273
Principal Linux Files
275
Managing the Boot Process
279
Linux Command Quick Reference
294
Index
303
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Bill McCarty is associate professor of management information systems in the School of Business and Management of Azusa Pacific University, Azusa, California, and was previously associate professor of computer science, in which capacity he taught for ten years in Azusa Pacific's Master of Applied Computer Science program. Bill holds a Ph.D. in the management of information systems from the Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, California, and worked for 15 years as a software developer and manager.

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