JavaScript: The Definitive Guide

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"O'Reilly Media, Inc.", Apr 25, 2011 - Computers - 1078 pages
4 Reviews

Since 1996, JavaScript: The Definitive Guide has been the bible for JavaScript programmers—a programmer's guide and comprehensive reference to the core language and to the client-side JavaScript APIs defined by web browsers.

The 6th edition covers HTML5 and ECMAScript 5. Many chapters have been completely rewritten to bring them in line with today's best web development practices. New chapters in this edition document jQuery and server side JavaScript. It's recommended for experienced programmers who want to learn the programming language of the Web, and for current JavaScript programmers who want to master it.

"A must-have reference for expert JavaScript programmers...well-organized and detailed."

--Brendan Eich, creator of JavaScript, CTO of Mozilla

"I made a career of what I learned from JavaScript: The Definitive Guide.”

-- Andrew Hedges, Tapulous

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - zzshupinga - LibraryThing

I was provided access by O'Reilly Publishing to an electronic copy of this book for review purposes. This is an updated edition to the classic reference book on Javascript to include new information ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - readafew - LibraryThing

This was an excellent reference book in it's time, however as JavaScript 1.2 it is a little dated. I still use it and it is still very helpful. I would definitely recommend the updated version of this book for use. Read full review

Contents

Part II ClientSide JavaScript
305
Part III Core JavaScript Reference
717
Part IV ClientSide JavaScript Reference
857

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About the author (2011)

David Flanagan is a programmer and writer with a website at http://davidflanagan.com. His other O'Reilly books include JavaScript Pocket Reference, The Ruby Programming Language, and Java in a Nutshell. David has a degree in computer science and engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He lives with his wife and children in the Pacific Northwest between the cities of Seattle, Washington, and Vancouver, British Columbia.

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