Movement Disorders: Genetics and Models

Front Cover
Mark S. LeDoux
Elsevier, Jan 25, 2005 - Medical - 824 pages
The use of animal models is a key aspect of scientific research in numerous fields of medicine. This book vigorously examines the important contributions and application of animal models to the understanding of human movement disorders and will serve as an essential resource for basic neuroscientists engaged in movement disorders research. Academic clinicians, translational researchers and basic scientists are brought together to connect experimental findings made in different animal models to the clinical features, pathophysiology and treatment of human movement disorders. A vital feature of this book is an accompanying DVD with video clips of human movement disorders and their corresponding animal models. The book is divided into sections on Parkinson disease, Huntington disease, dystonia, tremor, paroxysmal movement disorders, ataxia, myoclonus, restless legs syndrome, drug-induced movement disorders, multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy/corticobasal degeneration and spasticity. This book serves as an essential resource for both clinicians interested in the science being generated with animal models and basic scientists studying the pathogenesis of particular movement disorders.

* Provides a single comprehensive resource on animal models of movement disorders that academic clinicians, translational researchers, and basic neuroscientists can refer to
* Includes contributions by expert movement disorder clinicians and top-level researchers in the field
* Features a DVD containing over 170 video clips of human movement disorders and the corresponding animal models
 

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Contents

SCIENTIFIC FOUNDATIONS
1
PARKINSON DISEASE
127
DYSTONIA
227
HUNTINGTON DISEASE
299
TREMOR DISORDERS
335
MYOCLONUS
397
TIC DISORDERS
431
PAROXYSMAL MOVEMENT DISORDERS
449
PROGRESSIVE SUPRANUCLEAR PALSY AND CORTICOBASAL GANGLIONIC DEGENERATION
505
MULTIPLE SYSTEM ATROPHY
541
ATAXIAS
595
SPASTICITY
679
DRUGINDUCED MOVEMENT DISORDERS
713
RESTLESS LEGS SYNDROME
755
Index
759
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Mark S. LeDoux, MD, PhD is a physician-scientist at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. At present he holds a joint appointment as Professor in the Departments of Neurology, and Anatomy and Neurobiology. He specializes in the neurological subspecialty of movement disorders and treats patients at the University of Tennessee Medical Group and Memphis VA hospital. As an active clinical researcher, Dr. LeDoux’s work has focused on the genetics and treatment of dystonia, Parkinson disease and Huntington disease. He has described Huntington disease in a nonagenarian and reported one of the world’s largest pedigrees with HDL2. In the laboratory, Dr. LeDoux has published extensively on the genetics and molecular biology of dystonia, mechanisms of cell death in Parkinson’s disease, animal models of dystonia and autism, and the neuroanatomy of motor systems. His work with the dt rat engendered paradigm shifts in dystonia and motor systems research. Dr. LeDoux’s lab showed that familial and sporadic adult-onset primary dystonia may be associated with rare sequence variants in THAP1 and CIZ1.

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