The Works of Thomas Carlyle

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Cambridge University Press, Nov 11, 2010 - History - 334 pages
Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881) was one of the most influential authors of the nineteenth century. Eagerly studied at the highest level of intellectual society, his satirical essays and perceptive historical biographies caused him to be regarded for much of the Victorian period as a literary genius and eminent social philosopher. After graduating from Edinburgh University in 1814, he published his first scholarly work on German literature in 1824, before finding literary success with his ground-breaking history of the French Revolution in 1837. After falling from favour during the first part of the twentieth century, his work has more recently become the subject of scholarly re-examination. His introduction of German literature and philosophy into the British intellectual milieu profoundly influenced later philosophical ideas and literary studies. These volumes are reproduced from the 1896 Centenary Edition of his collected works. Volume 10 contains his social commentary Past and Present.
 

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Contents

Midas
1
The Sphinx
7
Manchester Insurrection
14
Morrisons Pill
23
Aristocracy of Talent
27
HeroWorship
33
BOOK II
34
THE ANCIENT MONK I Jocelin of Brakelond
39
The Beginnings
126
THE MODERN WORKER I Phenomena
136
Gospel of Mammonism
144
Gospel of Dilettantism
150
Happy
153
The English
157
Two Centuries
166
OverProduction
170

St Edmundsbury
46
Landlord Edmund
50
Abbot Hugo
57
Twelfth Century
62
Monk Samson
66
The Canvassing
73
The Election
76
Government
90
The Abbots Ways
94
The Abbots Troubles
99
In Parliament
104
Henry of Essex
106
PracticalDevotional 11
110
St Edmund
118
Unworking Aristocracy
174
Working Aristocracy
182
Plugson of Undershot
188
Labour
196
Reward
200
Democracy
209
Sir Jabesh Windbag
222
Morrison again
225
ohap PA0B
239
Bribery Committee
252
The Landed
282
The Gifted
288
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Thomas Carlyle was a social critic and historian born in Ecclefechan, Dumfriesshire, Scotland, December 4, 1795, the same year as John Keats, but Carlyle is considered an early Victorian rather than a Romantic. After completing his elementary studies, he went to the University of Edinburgh but left in 1814 without a degree. His parents wanted him to become a minister in the Scottish church, but his independence of spirit made such a life program impossible. In 1816 he fell in love with, and was rejected by, a young woman. His love affair was followed by a period of doubt and uncertainty described vividly in Sartor Resartus, a work published in 1833 that attracted much attention. Carlyle's first literary work reveals his admiration for German thought and philosophy, and especially for the two great German poets Schiller and Goethe. The fictional autobiography of a philosopher deeply impressed Ralph Waldo Emerson who brought it back to the United States to be published there. History of the French Revolution (1837), rewritten after parts of it were mistakenly burned as kindling by John Stuart Mill, cemented Carlyle's reputation. The work brought him fame but no great wealth. As a result of his comparative poverty he was induced to give four series of public lectures. Of these the most famous were those On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and the Heroic of History delivered in 1840 and published in 1841. Past and Present (1843), and Latter Day Pamphlets (1850) present his economic and industrial theories. With The Letters and Speeches of Oliver Cromwell (1845), The Life of John Sterling (1851), and History of Frederick II of Prussia, Called Frederick the Great (1858-1865) he returned to biography. In 1865, Carlyle was made Lord Rector of Edinburgh.