Behavioural Phenotypes in Clinical Practice

Front Cover
Gregory O'Brien
Cambridge University Press, Jan 21, 2002 - Medical - 239 pages
Clinics in Developmental Medicine No. 157

Clinicians, educators and other specialists who work with young people with intellectual disabilities are increasingly aware of the extent to which their clients' behaviours are shaped by the respective causal syndrome. This book is a practical response to the need for interventions and ongoing care programmes to take account of this within the context of coordinated multimodal case planning. An international team of experts drawn from child health, special education, psychology, psychiatry and related disciplines explores general principles of case management, in addition to giving consideration to a large number of individual syndromes, resulting in a comprehensive review of the subject. All of the authors have been involved in original research on the themes explored, and in the development of coherent service responses to the challenges posed by behavioural phenotypes. This will be essential reading for all professionals engaged in the care and management of people with intellectual disabilities.

 

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Contents

A OVERVIEW
13
CLINICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF BEHAVIOURAL PHENOTYPES
62
BEHAVIOURAL APPROACHES TO THE MANAGEMENT
104
PHARMACOLOGICAL INTERVENTIONS
123
COUNSELLING PARENTS AND CARERS OF INDIVIDUALS WITH
152
THERAPY
169
INDEX
228
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Gregory O'Brien was born in 1961 in Matamata New Zealand. He is a New Zealand poet, editor, and painter. He trained as a journalist in Auckland and worked as a newspaper reporter in Northland. He graduated from the University of Auckland. His work has appeared in Islands, Landfall and Sport, Meanjin, Scripsi. He lives in Wellington where he is Senior Curator at the City Gallery Wellington. His works include: Dunes and Barns, Man with a Child's Violin, Winter I Was, Afternoon of an Evening Train and Diesel Mystic. He has earned several awards including the Montana New Zealand Book Award for Poerty, Vicrotia University Writing Fellow and Prime Minister's Award for Literary Achievement. He is the author of See What I Can See (designed by Sarah Maxey and Katrina Duncan) which won the 2016 Publishers Association of New Zealand (PANZ) Book Design Award, Best educational book.

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