The Cranial Nerves: Anatomy · Pathology · Pathophysiology · Diagnosis · Treatment

Front Cover
M. Samii, P. J. Jannetta
Springer Science & Business Media, Dec 6, 2012 - Medical - 664 pages
No special field of surgery dealing with the cranial nerves exists today. This is not surprising in view of the characteristics of this group of morphologically and topo graphically heterogenous nerves. Morphologically we must differentiate between central nerves (I, II and VIII) and the so-called peripheral nerves (nn. III to VII and IX to XII), in which post-lesion rgeneration is quite different. Anatomo-topographi cally we must consider an intracranial and an extracranial part of each cranial nerve. For practical reasons at operation, further subdivisions of the intracranial course of cranial nerves are to be distinguished in the anterior, middle and posterior cranial fossae as well as within the petrous bone. This underscores the extensive tasks awaiting surgeons operating in the ventral part of the brain and facial skull as well as in the more dorsal part of the skull and neck. This very wide field cannot be covered by a single surgical discipline alone. In our opinion, considerable progress has been made in surgery of the cranial nerves only in recent years. This may be explained by the increased mastery of microsurgical techniques by all surgeons in terested in the surgery of the base of the skull as well as with the initiation of more interdisciplinary consultation and jointly performed operations. Possibilities of fu ture development can be discerned in the text. The base of the skull separating the extra-and intracranial part of cranial nerves should not be a barrier but a connect ing link.
 

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Contents

Table of Contents
Summary
Reference
References
Clinical
Conclusion
Taste Disturbance Through Lesions of Peripheral Nerves
Conclusions
The Central Peripheral Transition Zone
Methods and Results
References
Trigeminal Sensory Neuropathy
Percutaneous Controlled Thermocoagulation of Gasserian
Vascular Decompression in Trigeminal Neuralgia
Preoperative Evaluation
Critical Remarks on Different Surgical Methods in Trigeminal

Cases of Olfactory Tract Preservation and Its Functional
The Nervus terminalis
Optic Nerve Topographic Anatomy
The Diagnosis of Paralysis of the Accessory Nerve
Diagnosis of Optic Nerve Lesions with Newer Techniques
Preservation and Reconstruction of the Facial Nerve in
References
Conclusion
References
Surgery and Results
References
Surgical Technique
Discussion
References
References
Angiographic Aspects of the Arterial Supply of the Cranial
Conclusions
Optic Nerve Clinical Examinations and Findings
References
References
Subjects
Cisternoscopy
Methods of Clinical Examination
Summary
Surgical Technique
Summary of Cases
Trigeminal Root
Facial and Vestibulocochlear Nerve Topographic Anatomy
Fundus meatus acustici interni
Types of Relationship Fig
Variations of the Course of the Facial Nerve in the Middle
Study of the Intraneural Topography in Cadavers
Results
Idiopathic Facial Palsy
Conclusions
Childhood Optic Gliomas Microsurgical Treatment
Neurosynthesis of the Facial Nerve Electrical vs Clinical
Hemifacial Spasm
References
References
FacioFacial Anastomosis
Summary
Functional Testing of the Vestibular Nerve
Early Diagnosis of Eighth Cranial Nerve Lesions by Positional
Neurectomy of the Vestibular Nerve for Menières Disease
Early Experiences in Vascular Decompression for Vestibulo
Discussion
Preservation of Eighth Cranial Nerve in CerebelloPontine
Endoscopic Electromyography and Neurography
References
References
Conclusions
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