Fables and Satires: With a Preface on the Esopean Fable, Volume 1

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Printed by George Ramsay and Company for Archibald Constable and Co., 1809 - Classical literature
 

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Boothby's English verse translations of Aesop's fables are a minor masterpiece. Not only does Boothby cover the classical Aesop, he also includes his versions in verse of neo-Latin authors such as Abstemius, along with many of the French fabulists, too!
Volume 1 contains his translations of Phaedrus into English verse, plus his translation of Avianus, along with many other fables from Greek and Latin sources. Volume 2 carries on with the Greek and Latin fables, followed by translations from La Fontaine along with other modern European fabulists.
 

Contents

EpilogueThe Translator to the Author
113
The Wolf and the Mother
121
The Crab and her Daughter
122
The Sun and the Wind
123
The Hunters and the Bear
124
The Boy and the Thief
125
The Lark and her Young Ones
127
The Satyr and the Traveller
128
The Mau and the Goose
129
The Trumpeter taken Prisoner
130
The Ant and the Grasshopper
131
The Bald Knight
132
The Lion and the Man
133
The Crow and the Pitcher
134
The Lion and the Bulls
135
The Angler and the little Fish
136
The Wolf and the Kid
137
The Lion and the Goats
138
The Ape and her Young Ones
139
The envious Man and the Miser
140
The Firtree and the Thorn
141
The Fox and the Leopard
142
The Ass in the lions Skin
143
The Dog in the Manger
144
FABLES FROM THE GREEK AND LATIN Page
147
PrologueFiction and Truth
149
The City Mouse and the Country Mouse 1 50
150
The Mouse and the Weasel
152
The Sick Lion
153
The Sheep and the Wolves
154
The Heifer and theyoke of Oxen
155
The Ant and the Dove
156
The Stag and the Vine
157
The mischievous Dog
158
The Partridge and the Fowls
159
The Cameleon
160
The Statuary and Mercury
161
The Sick Man and the Physician
162
The Frogs and the Tortoise
163
The Crow and the Wolf
164
XVIJupiter and the Ass
165
The Farmer and the Stork
166
The two Bees
167
The Boys and the Frogs
168
The Oak and the Lilac
169
The Hawkand the Nightingale
170
The Wolf and the Kid
171
The Thief and his Mother
172
The Fuller and the Collier
173
The Frogs and the Mice
174
The Crow and the Peacock
175
The Farmer and his Sons
176
Fortune and the Boy
177

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Page xxiv - Encore si vous naissiez a 1'abri du feuillage dont je couvre le voisinage, — vous n'auriez pas tant a souffrir ; je vous defendrais de 1'orage. — Mais vous naissez le plus souvent sur les humides bords des royaumes du vent. — La nature envers vous me semble bien injuste.
Page xv - On ne peut trop louer trois sortes de personnes : Les Dieux, sa Maîtresse, et son Roi. Malherbe le disait ; j'y souscris quant à moi : Ce sont maximes toujours bonnes. La louange chatouille et gagne les esprits ; Les faveurs d'une belle en sont souvent le prix.
Page xxi - JEolus was addressed by both parties, to exert his most powerful efforts. This was no sooner asked than granted; and a violent hurricane arose: when the pliant Willow, bending from the blast, or shrinking...
Page xxv - The familiar style/ he continues, ' which is neither flat nor vulgar, is difficult to hit in any language ; and, I think, peculiarly so in the present state of the English. The chief force and beauty of this style seems to consist in the proper use of colloquial idioms. But as these are generally formed in the early periods of original tongues, while they are taking their cast and character ; in borrowed and compound languages like ours they will be neither abundant nor very expressive. And the few...
Page xxiv - L'arbre tient bon, le roseau plie; Le vent redouble ses efforts, Et fait si bien qu'il deracine Celui de qui la tete au ciel elait voisine, Et dont les pieds touchaient a 1'empire des morts.
Page xlii - ... a short neck, crokbacked, great bely, great legs, large feet ; and yet that which was worse, he was dombe, and could not speake: but notwithstanding this, he had a singular wit, and was greatly ingenious and subtyll in cavillations and plcasaunt in woordes, after he came to his speache, 8vo.
Page 187 - she says, ' to meet the sun ; Your task of yesterday 's undone ; A thousand fresh delights you miss, In dozing at an hour like this ; You lengthen out the hours of slumber Beyond what health and nature number ; Arise, if you a man would be ! From these enfeebling toils be free ! ' ' Lie still ! ' cries Sloth ; ' it is not warm ; An hour's more sleep can do no harm ; You will have time your work to do, And leisure for amusement too.
Page xxvii - Ics langues lettrees doivent changer de caractere, et perdre de la force en gagnant de la clarte'; que, plus on s'attache a perfectionner la grammaire et la logique, plus on...
Page xlii - Amonio : how he was of all other men most diffourmed and evil shapen : for he had a great head, a large visage, long jawes, sharp eyen, a short neck, crok-backed, great bely, great legs, large feet : and yet that which was worse, he was dombe, and could not speake : but notwithstanding this, he had a singular wit, and was greatly _ ingenious and subtyll in cavillations and plcasaunt in woordes, after he came to his speache.
Page xxi - ... evaded all its force, while the generous Oak, disdaining to give way, opposed its fury, and was torn up by the roots. Immediately the Willow began to exult, and to claim the victory, when thus the fallen Oak interrupted his exultation: Callest thou this a trial of strength ? Poor wretch ! not to thy strength, but weakness ; not to thy boldly facing danger, but meanly skulking from it, thou owest thy present safety.

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