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" Shall I believe That unsubstantial death is amorous ; And that the lean abhorred monster keeps Thee here in dark to be his paramour? For fear of that, I will still stay with thee, And never from this palace of dim night Depart again: here, here will I... "
Cymbeline. Romeo and Juliet - Page 115
by William Shakespeare - 1788
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Characters of Shakespeare's Plays

William Hazlitt - 1818 - 323 pages
...will stay still with thee; And never from this palace of dim night Depart again : here, here will 1 remain With worms that are thy chambermaids ; O, here Will I set up my everlasting rest ; And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars Frojp ili,- world wearied flesh.— Eyes, look your last...
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A dissertation on the disorder of death; or that state of the frame under ...

Walter Whiter - 1819 - 480 pages
...pale flag is not advanced there. "Ah! dear Juliet, *' Why art thou yet so fair ? shall I believe " That unsubstantial Death is amorous, " And that the...monster keeps " Thee here in dark to be his Paramour f " For fear of that I will stay with thee, " And never from this palace of dim night " Depart again."...
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The Plays of Shakspeare, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1819
...Shall I believe That unsubstantial death is amorous ; Vnd that the lean abhorred monster keeps [bee here in dark to be his paramour ? for fear of that, I will still stay with thee ; Ind never from this palace of dim night 3epart again ; here, here will I remain iVith worms that...
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Select Plays of William Shakespeare: In Six Volumes. With the ..., Volume 5

William Shakespeare, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens - 1820
...— Ah, dear Juliet, Wby art thou yet so fair ? Shall 1 believe That unsubstantial death is amorous;6 And that the lean abhorred monster keeps Thee here...dark to be his paramour ? For fear of that, I will stiil stay with thee; And never from this palace of dim night Depart again ; here, here will 1 remain...
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The Plays and Poems of William Shakspeare: With the Corrections ..., Volume 6

William Shakespeare - 1821
...stand thus : " — Ah, dear Juliet, " Why art thou yet so fair ? I will believe, " Shall I believe that unsubstantial death is amorous, " And that the...in dark to be his paramour ; " For fear of that I still will stay with thee. And that the lean abhorred monster keeps Thee here in dark to be his paramour?...
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The Plays and Poems of William Shakspeare, Volume 6

William Shakespeare - 1821
...where e'er thou tumblest in. " O true apothecary ! " Thy drugs are quick : thus with a kiss Idle.] " Depart again ; here, here, will I remain " With worms...chamber-maids : O, here " Will I set up my everlasting rest, " And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars, &c. " Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide ! " Thou...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare, in Ten Volumes: Troilus and ...

William Shakespeare - 1823
...was thine enemy ? Forgive me, cousin !—Ah, dear Juliet, Why art thou yet so fair ? shall I believe That unsubstantial death is amorous ; And that the...chambermaids ; O, here Will I set up my everlasting rest, And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars From this world-wearied flesh.—Eyes, look your last Arms,...
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The plays of William Shakspeare, pr. from the text of the ..., Volume 8

William Shakespeare - 1823
...was thine enemy ? Forgive me, cousin ! — Ah, dear Juliet, Why art thou yet so fair? Shall I believe That unsubstantial death is amorous ; And that the...dim night Depart again ; here, here will I remain r With worms that are thy chamber-maids ; O, here Will I set up my everlasting rest ; And shake the...
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The Plays of William Shakspeare, Volume 8

William Shakespeare - 1823
...thine enemy ? Forgive me, cousin ! — Ah! dear Juliet, Why art thou yet so fair ? Shall I believe That unsubstantial death is amorous ; And that the...monster keeps Thee here in dark to be his paramour? (1) The allusion is to a louvre or turret fall of windows, by means of which ancient halls, &c. are...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1824
...Shall 1 believe That unsubstantial death is amorous ; And that the lean abhorred monster keeps 1 he.- here in dark to be his paramour ' For fear of that,...will I remain With worms that are thy chambermaids ; 0, here Will I set up my everlasting rest ; And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars From this world-wearied...
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