Page images
PDF
EPUB

CO N T E N T S.

HISTORY OF THE WAR.

CH A P. I.

Death of the empress Elizabeth of Ruffia. Her character. State of the
power of Russia on her decease. Her nephew, Peter III. fucceeds. Intire
change of System. Peace with Pruffia. Peace between Prussia and Swe-

den. Prusian conquests restored. The czar enters into an alliance with

the king of Prussia. War with Denmark threatened. Its cause. Ex-

torted loan from Hamburgh. Campaign between Prufians and Austrians

opens. Pruffians obtain advantages in Saxony and Silesia. Sudden revo-

lution in Rusia,

(11)

CH A P. IV,

Causes of the revolution in Rusia. Czar irritates the clergy and soldiery.

Differences with the czarina. Conspiracy against him. Czar deposed by
the senate. Attempts an escape. His imprisonment and death. The cza-

rina declared empress. Her politic condual. Ingratiates berself with

the people.

(17)

S3

CHAP

CH A P. V.

Effe 27 of the revolution in Russia on the king of Pruffia's affa'rs. Situation

of the new emprejs Sbe adopts a neutrality. Ruffian conquests restored.

Rujiens quit the Pralstan camp King of Prufia draws marshal Daun

from Buckersdorff Schweidnitz beleged. Marshal Laudohn attacks the

prince of Buuri. Is repulsed. Diposition of ihe French and allied ar-

mies. Broglio removed. Battle of Grabenstein. French defeated. Lord

Granby drives the French from Hombourg, Prince Xavier of Saxony de-

feated. Gottingen evacitated. French army called from the Lower

Rhine.

[21]

C H A P. VI.

War in Portugal. Plan of the campaign. Miranda, Braganza, and Chaves

taken. Almeidla bifieged and taken. Count of La Lijpe arrives in Por-

dizal. Surprize of Valentia d'Alcantara, by general Burgoyne. Affair

of Villa Velba. Spaniards retire.

[28]

CH A P. VII.

Expedition against Martinico. Force fent thither. Troops land at Cas

Navire. Nature of the country. Attack of the polls near Fort Royal.

Fort Royal fyrrendered. St. Pierre and the zuhole island capitul te. St.

Lucie, the Grenades, and St. Vincent taken. Preparations for war against

the Spanish Wift Indies.

[33]

CHAP. VIIT.

Commanders in the expedition against the Havannah. Fleet fails from Ports-

mioitth. Papage through the old jireights of Bahama. Town and har- ,

bour of the Havana described. Troops land. Disposition of the troops.

Sirge of Fort Moro. Ca tain Harvey cannonades the Moro. Englijb

battery fired. Difress of the English forces. Succours arrive from

North America. The fort fiormed. Operations against the town.

The

Havannah surrenders. Advantages of this acquisition.

[36]

CHAP. IX.

Proposals for peace. State of the ministry and parties. Dukes of Bedford

and Nivernois employed in the negotiation. Newfoundland taken and re-

taken. W'ar in Germany. Hereditary prince defeated at Iohannisberg.

French, repulsed: Carel invested. Remarkable cannonade at Bucker Mubl.

French take Amoncbiurg. Cafjil Jurrendered to the allies. War in W2!!-

thalia concluded.

[45]

CHAP. X.

Siege and surrender of Schweidnitz. War transferred to Saxony. Austrians

tejented at Freyberg. Pruffians ravage the Empire. Preliminaries of

peace between Great Britain and France. Disputes concerning them.

Mr. 7. comes into the administration. Preliminaries at proved by parlia-

Peace of Hubertsbourg between Auftria and Prufia. Conclu-

1991.

[52]

THE

THE CHRONICL E. [65]

Letter wrote by prince Ferdinand to general Sporcken, on resigning to him the

command of the allied army
in Germany.

[123]

The Marquis of Granby's letter of thanks to the British forces in Germany (1241

An account of the extraordinary ceremonies observed, on account of the jove-

reign's presence at the installation of knights of the garter. [125]

An authentic narrative of the death of Mark Anthony Calas, and of the trial

and execution of bis father, John Calas, for the supposed murder of his

fon.

[126]

Some account of the murder of Anne Naylor, by Sarah Metyard, and her daugh-
ter Sarah Morgan Metyard.

1132]

Account of a remarkable forgery committed by John and Joseph Kello.

[138)

A Jummury account of the proceedings in regard to some ftrange noises,

heard the beginning of the year, at a houje in Cock-lane Weft-Smith.

field.

[142]

State of the land carriage fishery in London, to the end of September 1762. [147

An account of the sums raised by the land-tax since the revolution. (150)

Supplies granted by parliament for the service of the year 1761. (151)

Supplies granted by parliameet for the year 1762.

[164]

S T A T D P A P E R S.
His majesty's most gracious Speech to both houses of parliament, on Jung
2, 1762.

[178]
His majelly's molt gracious Speech to both houses of parliament, on Nov.

[179]

The humble address of the right han. the lords spiritual and temporal in

parliament assembled.

(181)

The humble address of the house of commons to the king.

[183]

The address of the archbishop, bishops, and clergy of the province of Cail-

terbury, in convocation aljembled.

[184)

Summary of the papers relative to the rupture with Spain.

1:;1

Translation of a paper delivered by the earl of Bristol, Nov. 18, 1761. (199)

Tranlation of a paper received by the earl of Egremont from the count de Fuen-

3, 1751; in anlwer to the foregoing.

1200]

Papers relating to the rupture of France and Spain with Portugal.

Translation of a memorial of the Spanish ambasador, and of the minister

plenipotentiary of France, to his most faithfu! mujejiy.

1-03]

Translation of the answer of the secretary of state of his mot faithful majesty,

to the foregoing memorial of the Spanislı ambasador, and the minijter

plenipoientiary of France.

(205)

Translation of a second memoriel of the ambasador of Spain, and of the

minisler plenipotentiary of France, delivered to M. da Cunha the 1st of
ápril 1762.

[2071

Tranjlation of the answer to the second memorial of the ministers of Spain and

France, of April 1, 1562.

[210]

Tranjlation of a third memorial presented !0 the secretary of state, Don Lewis
du Cunha, by Daniel Torero, bis Catholic mae'ti's embajador, uni
$ 4

M. Jame

25, 1762.

M. James O'Dun, his moft Cirriftian Majesty's minister plenipotentiary, 04

the 23d of April 1762.

[213]

Translation of the answer to the foregoing memorial.

(215)

Decree, or declaration of war, isued by order of his Portuguese majefty against

Spain.

[217]

The King of Spain's declaration of war against Portugal.

| 2181

The French king's declaration of war against Portugal.

[219]

Papers relative to the late revolution in Russia.

Manifesto of the present emprefs of Ruffia, on her accession to the throne as in-

dependent fovereign.

(222)

The empress's manifesto, giving an account of her motives for taking the reins
of government into her hands.

ibid.

Renunciation of Peter III.

[226]

Her imperial majesty's declaration, &c. on the death of the emperor her hul-

band.

[227]

Papers relating to the re-establishment of peace.

Declaration delivered by the emperor of Russia's order, to the Imperial, French,

and Swedish ministers residing at Petersburg,

[228]

The answer of the empre's queen to the foregoing declaration.

[229]

The answer given by the French court to the declaration.

ibid.
Answer given by the king of Poland, elector of Saxony, to the same declara-
tion,

ibid.

Speech ma le to the king by the duke de Nivernois.

[230]

the address of the houje of lords, Dec. 9, 1762.

The address of the house of commons.

[232]

The definitive treaty of peace, concluded at Paris Feb. 10, 1763. [233]

Declaration of his most Christian majesty's plenipotentiary.

[243]

Declaration of his Britannic majesty's ambasador extraordinary and plenipo-

tentiary.

[244]

Accelfion of his most faithful majesty.

ibid.

Declaration of his most faithful majesty's ambasador and minifter plenipoten-

tiary.

[245]

Preliminary articles omitted in the definitive treaty.

[246]

Declaration, hgned at Fontainbleau, the 3d of November, 1762, by the
French plenipotentiary.

ibid.

The king's proclamation of peace.

[247]

The definitive treaty of peace between the empress-queen, and the king of
Prusia.

ibid.

Papers relating to the conguest of Martinico.

Articles of capitulation of the citadel of Fort Royal, in the island of Marti-

nico.

(249]

Capitulation demanded by the inbabiiants of the island of Martinico. (251)

Capitulation offered for the whole island of Martinico

[254

Articles of capitulation agreed upon for the surrender of the Havannah (259)

Papers relating to the recovery of St. John's in Newfoundland from the

French.

Colin i Amherft": fummons to the governor of St. John's fort.

[ 264)

Srticies of cupitulation for the garrison of St. John's.

[265]

Letter

Letter from M. de Bougainville to Mr. Pitt.

[266]

Mr. Pitt's answer.

ibid.

Epitaph on the marquis de Montcalm.

[267]

CHARAC T E R S.

The life of Louis, late duke of Orleans.

I'

Memoirs of the life, &c. of the late Dr. Benjamin Hoadly, lord bishop of Wing

chester

6

Some account of the late Dr. Thomas Sherlock, bishop of London.

9

Account of the late Henry Fielding, Efq;

An account of the life of Ariosto.

23

Life of Inigo Jones.

25

Memoirs of M. d'Ensenada.

29

Memoirs of Count Zinzendorf:

32

Authentick conversation between the king of Prusia and the ingenious Mr.

Gellert.

35

Some account of the late Richard Nash, Esq;

A short character of his excellency Thomas, earl of Wharton, lord lieutenant

40

An account of the death of Oliver Cromwell, and the fucceffion of his fon Ri-

chard to the protectorship.

43

Remarkable speech of Richard Cromwell to his parliament.

45

A short view of the character and writings of M. de Voltaire.

48

An original letter from the duke of Buckingham to king James I.

Some account of a very extraordinary clergyman.

N A T U R A L HISTORY,

Observations on the bellies of salmons being always found empty.

53

Some account of the animal seat from the East Indies by general Clive, to his

royal highness the duke of Cumberland.

54

Account of a battle between a serpent and a buffalo.

History of Jeffery Hudson the dwarf.

On the existence of giants in South America.

59

Account of a girl who subfifted near four years on water alone,

61

of a periodical
dumbness.

62

of a French lady, blind from her infancy, who can read, write,

and play at cards, & c.

63

of the imposture of the boy of Bilson.

65

of the family at Wattisham, which has lately been aflicted with

the loss of their limbs.

67

of an amputation of a leg, without any subsequent hæmorrhage. 68

of a conception without rupture of the hymen.

69

of a remarkable mummy.

ibid.
of a body, which had been intirely converted into hair, a confi-

derable time after it was buried.

70

Observations on the hair of dead persons.

71

Tborghts on the poisonous effets of muscles.

ibid.

On

« PreviousContinue »