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" Let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering, sooner lost and worn, Than women's... "
The Metropolitan - Page 93
1846
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More Duologues for All Accents and Ages

Eamonn Jones, Jean Marlow - Performing Arts - 2004 - 168 pages
...then. What years i' faith? VIOLA About your years my Lord. DUKE Too old by heaven: let still the woman take An elder than herself, so wears she to him; So sways she level in her husband's heart: For boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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Will in the World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare

Stephen Greenblatt, Stephen Jay Greenblatt - Biography & Autobiography - 2004 - 430 pages
...proveth well" (3 Henry VI, 4.1.18) or in Count Orsino's advice in Twelfth Night Let still the woman take An elder than herself. So wears she to him; So sways she level in her husband's heart. (2.4.28-30) Of course, each of these lines has a specific dramatic context, but they were all written...
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The Great Comedies and Tragedies

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2005 - 896 pages
...What years, i'faith? VIOLA About your years, my lord. DUKE Too old, by heaven: let still the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart: 30 For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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The Shakespeare Claimants: A Critical Survey of the Four Principal Theories ...

H. N. Gibson - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 320 pages
...Duke and the disguised Viola, which contains the following lines spoken by the Duke : Let the woman take An elder than herself; so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. And a little later : Then let thy love be younger than thyself, Or thy affection cannot hold the bent;...
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The Yale Book of Quotations

Fred R. Shapiro, Associate Librarian and Lecturer in Legal Research Fred R Shapiro - Reference - 2006 - 1067 pages
...there shall be no more cakes and ale? Twelfth Night act 2, sc. 3, 1. n3 (1601) 242 Let still the woman ity Press Twelfth Night act 2, sc. 4, 1. 29 (1601) 243 Come away, come away death, And in sad cypress let me...
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A Monstrous Regiment of Women: A Novel of Suspense Featuring Mary Russell ...

Laurie R. King - Fiction - 1995 - 336 pages
...although it may not have been a union of conventional bliss, it was never dull. Let still the woman take An elder than herself: so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart; For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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Twelfth Night: Shakespeare for the Modern Reader

John Burfeind, William Shakespeare - Drama - 2008 - 195 pages
...for me to untie! Act II Scene IV Orsino Gives Advice to Viola Too old by heaven, let still the woman take An elder than herself. So wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart. For, boy, however we do praise ourselves, Our fancies are more giddy and unfirm, More longing, wavering,...
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